How to Create a Simple Base for an Unusual Piece

By Bruce Johnson

When I saw this unusual piece of Southwestern pottery, I knew it would look great in my son Eric’s apartment in Salt Lake City. But as you can see, it has a small base, which made it easy to tip over.

The base had a hole in the bottom, so I devised a way that I could mount the pottery on an unfinished pine board I found at one of our local craft stores.

Minwax One Coat Polyurethane

First, though, I stained the board with Minwax® Wood Finish™  in “Classic Gray” to give the wood more of an aged, worn look that would go well with the piece of pottery. Afterwards, I protected the wood and the stain with a coat of Minwax® One Coat Polyurethane in a semi-gloss sheen.

To prevent the pottery from tipping over, I traced the opening in the bottom of the piece, cut out this piece of wood to match it, then ran a screw up through the bottom to secure it in place on top of the wood base.

I then was able to slip the piece of pottery down over the block of wood, which stabilized it, while still enabling Eric to lift it off if he decides to display it differently.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

About Bruce Johnson

Author-craftsman Bruce Johnson has introduced millions of do-it-yourselfers, craftspeople and antique collectors to the world of wood finishing and antique restoration. As the official spokesperson for Minwax®, the leading manufacturer of wood finishing and wood care products, Bruce motivates people to take the initiative to beautify their surroundings. Through his many books, magazine articles and columns, as well as frequent appearances on national television talk shows, Johnson is recognized as an authority in the do-it-yourself community. Appearing on PBS, HGTV, The Discovery Channel, and currently hosting “DIY Woodworking” and “Build A Log Cabin”, on the DIY cable network, Johnson has brought the illustrious craft of wood finishing to the forefront of the American home. An expert in wood refinishing, antique restoration, and home improvement, Bruce has published more than a dozen books on these topics, including Fifty Simple Ways To Save Your House, The Wood Finisher, The Weekend Refinisher, and The Official Identification and Price Guide to the Arts and Crafts Movement. For more than 20-years, he penned an antique refinishing advice column, "Knock on Wood," which ran in dozens of antique/collectibles publications. Currently, he writes a column on Arts & Crafts for Style 1900 magazine. A rare combination of craftsman and journalist, Johnson began his career as a high school English teacher, but left teaching to set up his "Knock on Wood Antique Repair & Restoration" shop. He spent the next 10 years as a full-time professional refinisher, but eventually returned to writing. Yet, Johnson says, he won't ever be without a workbench and a couple of refinishing projects down in the basement. Johnson is also the founder and director of the Arts and Crafts Conference and Antique Show held every February in Asheville, North Carolina, at the Grove Park Inn. The conference, which includes the largest Arts and Crafts antiques show, attracts more than 1500 Arts and Crafts collectors each year to its many seminars, tours, demonstrations and exhibits. Johnson is proud to have played a role in reviving interest in designers like Gustav Stickley, who founded the Arts and Crafts movement. His latest book, “Grove Park Inn Arts & Crafts Furniture,” was awarded the 2009 Thomas Wolfe Literary Award. These furnishings are treasured by such collectors as Steven Spielberg and Bruce Willis, among many others.

Leave A Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *