Monthly Archives: March 2016

A Few Colorful Frames

April is Minwax National Woodworking Month®! To celebrate, wood finishing expert Bruce Johnson has written a few blog posts to inspire you to tackle a DIY project this month. Don’t forget to download the Minwax National Woodworking Month® mail-in rebate form, you could save up to $17 on select Minwax® products. 

For several years I organized a DIY stain and finish class in which the students worked on frames I made in my workshop. Over time I accumulated several leftover frames that I finally decided to “DIY-it myself” — and finish them for my collection of Arts and Crafts posters.

After a light sanding, I brushed a coat of  Minwax® Water-Based Pre-Stain Wood Conditioner on each one to decrease the likelihood of the wood turning blotchy when I applied my stain.

I love the Water Based Wood Stains because of the wide variety of colors, including “Green Tea” that I rubbed onto this particular frame.

Minwax® Water Based Wood Stains also come in several wood tone colors, including “American Walnut” shown on this frame, which I topcoated with clear Minwax® Polycrylic® Protective Finish, just as I did the other colors.

Since water-based products dry so quickly, I was able to condition, stain, and finish several frames over one weekend. I hung them downstairs in our house on Sunday evening, making me feel good about both utilizing the frames and getting my posters displayed!

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

Download the Minwax National Woodworking Month® mail-in rebate form here.

How to Fix a Water-Stained Bench

We had a heavy downpour last week, which caused the skylight in our bedroom to leak. The water sat overnight on an oak bench I had built more than twenty years ago and finished with shellac. As you can see, the shellac had little resistance to the water.

In cases like this, the only solution is to sand off the old finish. For this I used my palm sander and #180-grit sandpaper. Since I was only refinishing the top of the bench, I protected the end boards from the sander with blue masking tape.

After vacuuming off the dust, I reached for a can of Minwax® Wood Finish™ in “Gunstock”. It can be applied with either a brush or a cloth, but all excess stain has to be wiped off before it dries, as the stain belongs in the wood, not on top if the wood.

Instead of shellac, this time I used the satin sheen of Minwax® Fast-Drying Polyurethane. The satin sheen gives it an antique look, but it still has the polyurethane protection my bench needs.

Just a faint reminder of the water stain remains, as I purposely only did a light sanding to preserve the aged look of the oak bench. I could have removed all of the stain with a belt sander and bleach, but that would have also erased the “character” of my bench.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

 

 

Get Creative with Driftwood Art

If like me you enjoy picking up driftwood along a beach or shoreline, then you’ll also enjoy this project. I began by gently cleaning the piece with a brass bristle brush (which is softer than a steel brush), then vacuuming off the dirt and any insects that came along for the ride.

To prevent the wood from crumbling, I brushed on a thin coat of Minwax® Polycrylic® Protective Finish, which also brought out the grain of the driftwood.

With a thin wire stretched across the back, I could then hang my new piece of nature’s artwork on the wall in my office, a pleasant reminder of my day at the beach.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce