Monthly Archives: January 2017

Create a Stain Dipped Stool

As you may have discovered, furniture in storage does not fare well. I had used this stool for a staining demonstration on a television show I did last year, but afterwards it ended up in my storage room. Before long it had creeping mildew, not to mention, a colony of spiders living on it.

A friend turned me on to the “dipped” look which is now popular. After a light sanding to erase the mildew and scare away the spiders, I measured four inches down from the top of each leg, then wrapped it several times with masking tape.

I then opened a can of “Island Water,” a Water Based Minwax® stain, and applied stain to the area above each of the four taped legs. I then gave the top a fresh coat of stain to match.

After the stain had dried, all that was left was to spray on a coat of aerosol Minwax® Polycrylic™ Protective Finish. Since both the water-based stain and the Polycrylic dry quickly, before the day was done I was able to move my “dipped” stool into the house and near our fireplace.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

Reduce Clutter with an Old Drawer and Mason Jars

 

I have to admit, even I was stumped over what I could possibly do with this old, small oak drawer that had long since been separated from its dresser, and was now taking up valuable space under Leigh Ann’s workbench.

But then I spotted a box of vintage Mason jars at a thrift shop for 50¢ each, and had an idea. I pulled the drawer out from beneath the workbench, cleaned it up and discovered the sides had never been stained or finished. Since I wanted both sides to look as nice as the front of the drawer, I slipped one of the eight pre-moistened stain-and-finish cloths out of a “Maple” package of Minwax® Wood Finishing Cloths. In just a few minutes, and with just one cloth, I had stained and finished both the sides and back.

While the water based stain and finish dried, I started pulling Mason jars and their lids out of the box and getting them ready. I discovered I could fit five into my lone drawer, which was perfect for what I had in mind.

The old drawer then fit perfectly atop our kitchen counter, near the stove, where I now use it to hold wooden utensils, plus a few flowers to brighten up our work area.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

Get Organized with This Cherry Bookstand

Several years ago I made a simple cherry book rack for a television series I was shooting for the DIY network. This was one that I never finished, but had stowed away in a storage tub. I decided it was certainly worth finishing and giving to my son Blake, who is still in school.

Since cherry is a hardwood with a subtle grain, I only used #180-grit sandpaper, as anything coarse would leave swirling scratch marks in the wood.

My all-time favorite finish for cherry is a penetrating oil, such as Minwax® Wipe-On Poly, that I rub into the wood.

As you can see, the Wipe On Poly brings out the grain of the cherry, while giving it that hand-rubbed appearance we love to see.

It only took two coats to protect the wood and leave a satin sheen, making this a perfect desktop book rack for anyone you know. This one measures 11″ high by 8″ deep by 13″ wide, but you can make yours whatever size fits your space – and can draw the curve in whatever manner you like.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

How to Create a Simple Base for an Unusual Piece

When I saw this unusual piece of Southwestern pottery, I knew it would look great in my son Eric’s apartment in Salt Lake City. But as you can see, it has a small base, which made it easy to tip over.

The base had a hole in the bottom, so I devised a way that I could mount the pottery on an unfinished pine board I found at one of our local craft stores.

Minwax One Coat Polyurethane

First, though, I stained the board with Minwax® Wood Finish™  in “Classic Gray” to give the wood more of an aged, worn look that would go well with the piece of pottery. Afterwards, I protected the wood and the stain with a coat of Minwax® One Coat Polyurethane in a semi-gloss sheen.

To prevent the pottery from tipping over, I traced the opening in the bottom of the piece, cut out this piece of wood to match it, then ran a screw up through the bottom to secure it in place on top of the wood base.

I then was able to slip the piece of pottery down over the block of wood, which stabilized it, while still enabling Eric to lift it off if he decides to display it differently.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce