Monthly Archives: April 2017

A Vintage Hatbox Revived As the Perfect Gift

April is Minwax National Woodworking Month®! To celebrate, Minwax® expert Bruce Johnson has put together some of his favorite tips & tricks for using Minwax® products. Don’t forget to download the Minwax National Woodworking Month® mail-in rebate form, you could save up to $17 on select Minwax® products. 

BeforeFor several years now, Leigh Ann has had this antique Victorian hatbox, with a drawer for gloves, that had been taken from a tall dresser her grandmother once owned. With Leigh Ann’s birthday fast approaching, I decided I could find a new use for it.

Wood Filler The top had a few unsightly nail holes, so I squeezed in some Minwax® Stainable Wood Filler, let it dry, and sanded each one smooth with the wood.

Stain side The original color of the oak hatbox was still attractive, but badly worn, so after a light sanding I applied a fresh coat of Minwax® Wood Finish™ in “English Chestnut” to even out the color.

Base stain I used the same color to stain a new oak base I plan to set it on when it is complete.

Spray Tray At our craft supply store, I picked up four unfinished pine trays and sprayed each one with two coats of Minwax® Clear Aerosol Lacquer. After the lacquer had dried, I cut a piece of felt to line the bottom of each one, as well as the bottom of the glove drawer. By this time, the English Chestnut stain had dried, so I protected all the wood with three light coats of Minwax® Clear Aerosol Lacquer.

ClosedI then installed two plywood shelves inside the box where a Victorian gentleman would have stored his tall hat. Next, I screwed the hatbox to the new oak base, rehung the door and slipped the drawer back into place.

OpenNow instead of a Victorian hatbox she never quite could decide what to do with, Leigh Ann has a new place to store and display her jewelry, as well as a daily memory of her grandmother.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

Take Gardening Indoors and Create a Wall Garden with MyFixItUpLife

By: Guest Blogger

April is Minwax National Woodworking Month®! Download the Minwax National Woodworking Month® mail-in rebate form and you could save up to $17 on select Minwax® products. 

Guest Blogger Theresa of MyFixItUpLife is back with a great project allowing you to show off your green thumb inside your home. Follow her step-by-step instructions to learn how to create this gorgeous indoor wall garden to put your succulents on display.

Enjoying pretty little plants can be a year-round pleasure with a custom-stained pallet indoor wall garden.

1-measure-succulents-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-ArtThe size of the succulents dictated the size of this indoor wall garden.

I’ve been a little obsessed with making projects from pallets and finding new ways to display succulents around my home. Those little bulbous plants are so perfect for a busy family lifestyle, as they don’t require much maintenance beyond watering. And they only like to be re-watered when their soil is dry.

As I was thinking about new excuses to incorporate succulents into my formal-farmhouse home decor, I landed on the idea of creating living wall art as an indoor wall garden. Vertical gardens can be any size and shape, which makes creating them so much fun. And a wall garden can be customized to the style of your home, just by changing the material, shape, and the stain color.

For this project, I immediately envisioned using a charming color that I’ve chosen before for our dining table makeover. I smile about the Antique Jade from the Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain collection every time I sit down to eat. After months of use, the joy still hasn’t faded into the background, and I suspect it never will.

Supplies for the indoor wall garden.

Succulents. Before I started on this DIY project, I ordered a collection of succulents from Amazon in 2-inch pots. The two inches became the measurement that dictated the rest of the project.

Pallet wood. We have been building a variety of projects with pallets over the past few months, so I was lucky to have a collection of cut-offs in our wood pile. Finding a pallet can be easy or tough, depending on where you live. Typically your local Habitat for Humanity ReStore has pallets.

Stain. I chose Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain in Antique Jade, and used a synthetic brush to apply the stain.

Tools. For this project I used a cordless miter saw (an oscillating tool with clamps also would work), tape measure, impact driver, pencil, square, oscillating tool for sanding (sandpaper works fine, too), and all-purpose glue.

How-to for the indoor wall garden.

2-measure-pallet-wood-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-ArtThe first step to this project is measuring the pieces.

2d-measure-pallet-wood-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-ArtAfter marking each triangle, I checked the hypotenuse of the triangle.

3c-cut-pallet-wood-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-ArtCutting each triangle is fairly easy on a miter saw, but it isn’t the only saw that can cut the pieces.

5-layout-the-pieces-for-the-planter-boxes-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-ArtAfter cutting each piece, I lined them up to check that I cut everything I needed.

6-create-the-backer-for-the-planter-from-pallet-wood-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-ArtThe next part is creating the backer for the wall garden. We have a collection of small pieces of pallet wood, so it was a patchwork project fitting them all together.It would be much easier with long boards.

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IMG_2830The first step in staining involves some Minwax® Water Based Pre-Stain Wood Conditioner, which helps promote a uniform acceptance of stain. When working with pallet wood, I definitely recommend using a pre-stain. After the pre-stain is dry, which is about 15 minutes, lightly sand the finish before applying the stain.

13-first-dip-into-stain-antique-jade-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-ArtThere’s something magical about opening a can of color. I chose Minwax® Based Wood Stain in Antique Jade. I always make sure to carefully dip the brush so not to get too much on the brush for the first few passes.

Screenshot-2017-02-22-11.36.50The Cottage collection from Minwax® has a really sweet color palette of charming colors, perfect for a farmhouse style home.

14b-brushing-on-stain-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-ArtWhen staining wood, I like to go slow. Rushing a stain project can compromise a really good finish, and this stain will make the project last a very long time.

15-lining-inside-bottom-of-the-planter-boxes-for-water-sealing-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-Art-gorilla-glueI lined the bottom of each planter box with clear tape, so to add a bit of extra protection against water in the planter boxes.

IMG_2832-2The next step is sealing the stain with a protective finish. I recommend using Minwax® Polycrylic™ Protective Finish. It is ideal for sealing light-colored stains.

IMG_2271My little wall garden makes me very happy. The stain elevates the look from feeling like a rustic pallet into a sweet little wall art that warms up the room.

16f-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-Art-e1487787068146Filled with little succulents, the wall art is a little pop of bliss in my home. Enjoying succulents in a new way, I’m happy to have spent the afternoon creating this project for my family to enjoy year-round.

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MyFixitUpLife shares design inspiration, DIY tips, and behind-the-scenes interviews MyFixitUpLife’s husband-and-wife duo, Mark & Theresa, design, renovate, and share how-to tips to make your projects easier and more fun.

A Vintage Gift for Any Golfer

April is Minwax National Woodworking Month®! To celebrate, Minwax® expert Bruce Johnson has put together some of his favorite tips & tricks for using Minwax® products. Don’t forget to download the Minwax National Woodworking Month® mail-in rebate form, you could save up to $17 on select Minwax® products. 

I love digging through thrift shops, especially when I’m looking for a gift for a special friend or relative, such as my brother-in-law, who loves to golf. When I spotted this vintage wooden shaft 8-iron for just $15, I knew I had a bargain.

The golf club had some issues, including some spots of rust. I did not want to make it look brand new, so I just used a pad of fine steel wool dipped in Minwax® Paste Finishing Wax to remove the loose rust and provide a protective barrier to prevent any more rust from forming.

I used the same Minwax® Paste Finishing Wax on a soft cloth to also revive and restore the original finish on the wooden shaft. After letting it partially dry, I buffed off the excess wax, leaving a satin sheen afterwards.

And now the once forgotten Spalding 8-iron has become a treasured part of my brother-in-law’s “man cave” down in his basement.

Until next time,

Never stop looking!

Bruce

Create a DIY Mid-Century Planter on a Budget

By: Guest Blogger

April is Minwax National Woodworking Month®! Download the Minwax National Woodworking Month® mail-in rebate form and you could save up to $17 on select Minwax® products. 

Guest Blogger Jen of City Farmhouse is back to show you how you can have high-end home decor without the high costs that come along with it. Follow along with her tutorial to learn how you can create your own chic, mid-century planter for a fraction of the price.

West-Elm-Knock-Off-Planter-Save-over-100

Hi there friends! If you are one to spot trends then you have probably noticed the wood leg planter around town. I found them for the first time last year at Target and fell in love. I waited for them to go on clearance, then snatched them up. They have a clean, mid-century modern look that is super stylish & chic but can be a bit pricey. I found the ones I used for this project a few weeks ago at West Elm and knew right away that they were a great look. The mix of wood and cement were a perfect pairing of textures. Once I saw the price I knew a DIY was in order.

Growing up my dad would always joke with me that I had caviar taste on a McDonald’s budget and I am not going to lie, I did. But the most wonderful thing was that I had a mom who encouraged me to be resourceful.Anytime I wanted something expensive, which god knows we couldn’t afford it, she would help me get the look for less. So often it was easier than I thought and this project is no exception.

West-Elm-Planter

 

I am thrilled to be partnering on Minwax on this project as a part of their Blogger Brigade in 2017. The retail on this Wood Leg Cement Planter is $149 and I was able to make it for just over $20. This project is so simple, anyone, at any DIY level can do this.

Here is what you will need to tackle your own West Elm knock off planter….

cement planter

2-36″ lengths of square 3/4″ poplar or pine

Minwax® Wood Finishing Cloths in Natural Oak & Minwax® Wood Finish™ in Puritan Pine. 

  • Wood Glue
  • 1.5″ finishing nails
  • 4 clamps
  • drill with small bit
  • sander or sandpaper
  • cotton cloth
  • latex gloves

Modern-Finish-With-Minwax

Now you are ready to the make your “x” base after the stain is dry. You are going to attach your pre-stained pieces with wood glue and a clamp. Once the glue has dried you can flip it over and attach the fastener with screws and wood glue. See below images to get a visual.

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Once your “x” brackets are fully dried you can attach the legs using glue and clamps. Once they are fully dry you can nail in a finishing nail, be sure to pre-drill first.

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You can sand away any residual glue with sandpaper or a hand sander.

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Tada….

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Thank you for stopping by! Have a happy day!

Jen shares DIY projects and thrifty decorating solutions. Her design philosophy is that bringing style to your home doesn’t have to break the bank. Learn more about Jen and visit City Farmhouse. You Can also follow her on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.