Monthly Archives: July 2017

Glass Light Shade Vase: Three Ways with Not JUST a Housewife

By: Guest Blogger

Guest blogger Stacy Risenmay of Not JUST A Housewife is back with a chic, whimsical DIY solution for displaying your summer flowers. Follow her tutorial and see how to create your own glass light shade vase.

When I finished the bathroom in the basement, we couldn’t do recessed lights because of all the pipes and such in the ceiling. I had to find light that didn’t hang down very far from the ceiling since the ceiling is lower in the basement than upstairs and I have a tall husband. I have a love affair with seeded glass (glass with bubbles) and so I ordered some seeded glass light shades online. I ended up with an extra one and it has been sitting on the window ledge for almost two years collecting dust. Every time I get in the shower, I see it sitting there and think that I should do something with it. I decided to make a vase out of it but never got around to it since I could not decide on which base idea to create. Well, this week I decided to make all three and see which one I liked best!

seeded-glass-light-shade

Ever since my first trip to Trader Joe’s a couple weeks ago, I have been wanting to go back for some more fresh flowers. A post about vases was the perfect excuse! It is probably a good thing it is an hour away or I would spend most of my money there.

 Vase 1: Hanging Vase

This first vase I decided to make round. You could make it any shape you want really. After tracing a bowl on the wood, I cut out the 9 inch circle. I then traced another circle in the center. It was 4 inches. Drill a hole large enough that your jigsaw blade can fit then use the jigsaw to cut out the center circle. Be sure to sand it all really well with a 220 grit sandpaper.

drill-hole-for-jig-saw-blade-to-fit

I stained it the same color as the peg board and boxes in my new office closet. I love it!

stain-wood-base

Once the stain was dry, I drilled three small holes evenly around the circle and threaded faux leather lacing through it. I knotted the ends so it wouldn’t pull back through the small holes.

hanging-vase-leather-straps

I still can’t believe these giant sunflowers were only a few bucks at Trader Joe’s!

hanging-vase-with-sunflowers

 

Vase 2: Gold Legs

For this one, I cut out an 8 inch by 8 inch square. I traced a 5 inch circle in the center. Just like the one above, I drilled a hole big enough for the jigsaw blade to fit. I cut out the hole and sanded the whole thing really well.

I had a 1 inch wooden dowel I was going to use for the legs so I used a 1 inch drill bit to drill holes in each corner. Measure and mark it before drilling.

I cut the dowel into 2 1/2 inch pieces for the legs. I didn’t want to too tall, but it needed to be just tall enough that the bottom of the vase wouldn’t touch the table top. Think pot bellied pig verses gangly teenage boy.

drill-holes-for-legs

I stained it using Minwax® Wood Finish in “Early American.” The legs I spray painted gold. I added some wood glue and pushed the legs into the holes. I waited for the glue to dry before turning it over and adding the vase.

vase-with-stand

I love that you can see the legs on the top!

vase-with-gold-legs

I ended up liking the 5 inch size hole better than the 4 inch hole.

flower-vase-with-gold-legs

 

Vase 3: Geometric!

I started out by cutting three 8 inch squares out of plywood. You can use any wood, I just chose to use scrap wood for these vases. Once I had the square cut, I measured and marked about an inch and a half from each corner, drew a line, and using the miter saw chopped off the corners. It helps to have clamps to hold the wood in pace on the base of the saw. This created the octagonal shape.

Like the hanging vase, I drilled a large hole for the saw blade to fit through. I used the jigsaw to cut out a center circle in two of the pieces.

drill-hole-for-saw-blade-to-fit-and-then-cut-out-center

You will end up with two pieces that have center circles and one that does not. You can either use wood glue to attach them together or a brad nailer. Putty it really well and when dry, sand it smooth.

 

pieces-for-geometric-vase

I painted it my favorite cobalt blue!

 

paint-the-vase

It looks so cheery on the shelf!

geometric-vase

 

Real gerbera daisies are so perfect that they look fake even in person! They are such a great cut flower.

 

geometric-vase-with-gerber-daisies

Be sure to check out Minwax’s new “Made With Love. Finished With Minwax.” campaign currently going on. The theme is ‘Find. Finish. Love.,’ celebrating the thrill of finding real wood pieces – sometimes in the least expected places – and the joy of making them into something we love.

Stacy Risenmay is a DIY enthusiast. In her blog, Not Just a Housewife, she shares her adventures of fixing up her 1938 cottage. She believes that whether it’s big or small, everyone should love their space. Learn more about Stacy and visit: http://www.notjustahousewife.net/about. You can also follow Stacy on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram

 

A Clock From Pallet Scraps

1. Start

Using a few scrap pallet boards in my garage workshop, I decided to make a simple clock. I cut three the same length, added some trim around the edges, and drilled a small hole in the center.

2. backHere’s what the back looks like after I inserted an inexpensive, battery-operated clock, attached to the wood with a nut and washer on the front.

3. Poly

While I like the rustic look of pallet boards, I think they look even better after a light sanding and a coat of water-based Minwax® Polycrylic™ Protective Finish.

Clock #s

It dried fairly quickly, after which I pressed on a set of self-adhesive numbers and the clock hands.

Clock Hero

And in no time at all (yes, a bad pun), my pallet clock was finished and ticking away.

Be sure to check out Minwax’s new “Made With Love. Finished With Minwax.” campaign currently going on. The theme is ‘Find. Finish. Love.,’ celebrating the thrill of finding real wood pieces – sometimes in the least expected places – and the joy of making them into something we love.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

DIY Modern Planter Box with Not JUST a Housewife

By: Guest Blogger

Guest blogger Stacy Risenmay of Not JUST A Housewife is back with a fun project for anyone with a green thumb. Follow her tutorial and see how to bring your garden indoors with this DIY modern planter box. 

Sometimes when I have a big project that is starting to feel overwhelming, I like to stop for a bit and work on a smaller project. I think I just need to FINISH something. When the project or room I am working on seems like it will never be done, it is nice to have a sense of accomplishment that something did get finished. Shane calls it project ADD, I call it keeping my sanity :)

The big project I needed a tiny break from is our upstairs bathroom. The little project I decided to do was this DIY modern planter box.  I partnered with Minwax® to bring you the tutorial. It is pretty simple and would look great indoors or outside on a porch.

planter-box

slatted-planter

Supplies:

3/4″ plywood

Table saw

Miter Saw

Lattice trim

Brad nailer gun

Drill

1 1/2″ screws

Wood Putty

Sandpaper

Black paint

Minwax® Water Based Wood Sheen

Foam brush

Paper towels

1 1/2″ casters

First, you need to cut out the pieces for the box. I wanted it to be 12 inches wide by 14 inches tall. Since I was doing a basic butt joint, two sides had to be narrower to fit inside the other two sides. You could always do a 45 degree cut to have a prettier corner, but since it was going to be painted and mostly covered up, I didn’t think it mattered to take the extra time. Add the width of two boards and then subtract that from the width you want it to be when completed. For 3/4 inch boards, that is 1 1/2 inches making the inside boards 10.5 inches instead of 12. Because the bottom piece will also fit inside, it will also need to be 10.5 inches.

peices-for-planter-box

Because planters will be getting wet when watering the plants inside, the wood will want to warp over time. I have found that brad nails do not hold up well over time. I use screws to hold together planters. Screw together your box, sand it well, and then paint or stain it the base color.

black-base-color

I cut the trim on my miter saw to have 45 degree cuts on each end so when they meet up at the corner they had a nice mitered corner instead of a butt joint. Nail the trim on with a finishing brad nailer or glue it and hold it on with clamps until the glue dries.

nail-the-lattice-trim-on-the-box

Fill the nail holes and any gaps using a wood putty. When it is dry, sand it smooth. Make sure you sand off all putty except where the little nail hole was. Even though putty is stainable, it is only stainable to a point and your finish may look splotchy if you don’t sand off all the extra putty.

putty-nail-holes

Wipe down the planter box after sanding. I ended up hosing mine down because the sawdust in all the little recessed areas was hard to wipe off.  When it is dry, it is time to stain! I chose to use this Minwax® Water Based Wood Sheen. Since it is water-based, it is easy to clean up and because it has a sheen to it, I made sure to wipe off any that got on the painted wood by running a damp cloth over the painted parts. If I had an extra foam brush (I go through them like crazy!) I would have used a damp foam brush since it would have fit so well in between the slats. I did two thin coats. The more coats you add, the more sheen your project will have. I like satin or matte finishes so I didn’t add more but you certainly could for a richer and shinier look.

Minwax-Wood-Sheen

I am really happy with how it turned out! It is actually going to go in one of the boy rooms I am hoping to work on this summer. That is my next big project after the bathroom renovation. One of the rooms will have a mid-century modern vibe and I think this DIY planter will fit right in with the design.

slat-planter

But for now it will happily reside in our family room!

DIY-modern-planter

 Be sure to check out Minwax’s new “Made With Love. Finished With Minwax.” campaign currently going on. The theme is ‘Find. Finish. Love.,’ celebrating the thrill of finding real wood pieces – sometimes in the least expected places – and the joy of making them into something we love.

Stacy Risenmay is a DIY enthusiast. In her blog, Not Just a Housewife, she shares her adventures of fixing up her 1938 cottage. She believes that whether it’s big or small, everyone should love their space. Learn more about Stacy and visit: http://www.notjustahousewife.net/about. You can also follow Stacy on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram

A Simple Green Centerpiece

1. Boards

With everything outdoors turning green, I decided I would find a way to bring some of that wonderful green indoors. I started by going into my workshop and pulling two oak boards off my shelf.

2. Stain

Making a simple box to sit on our dining room table was easy, as was staining it Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain in “Hunter Green.” After it dried, I protected it with Minwax® Polycrylic™ Protective Finish, another water-based product.

3. Hinge

To give my now green box some character, I decided to add two black gate hinges to each side.

Pull

And then added two simple pulls, one at either end.

Jars

I thought about filling my Hunter Green box with artificial flowers, but then spotted some inexpensive canning jars at the grocery store and had an idea: put an inch of drainage rocks in the bottom, then plant live flowers in each one.

Hero

The combination of my green box and several jars of green, colorful flowers certainly will bring some some beautiful color to our dining room. And since the jars don’t have holes in the bottom like standard pots, I won’t have to worry about water leaking onto our table.

Be sure to check out Minwax’s new “Made With Love. Finished With Minwax.” campaign currently going on. The theme is ‘Find. Finish. Love.,’ celebrating the thrill of finding real wood pieces – sometimes in the least expected places – and the joy of making them into something we love.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce