Category Archives: Clear Lacquer Finish

Create a Beautiful & Simple Magazine Rack with Just Two Board Pieces

We tend to keep our favorite magazines around for a while before recycling them. So when I saw a simple plan for a two-board magazine stand, I knew it was for us. I started by cutting a notch in the center that was equal to half the width of each 30” board. I then sanded each side smooth.

Since I was using pine, a wood that turns blotchy when stained, I gave it a liberal coat of Minwax® Pre-Stain Wood Conditioner, then waited fifteen minutes before staining.

I wanted a grayish color to blend with the couch in our family room, so selected Minwax® Wood Finish™ in Classic Gray,  and applied it with a foam brush, then wiped off all the excess stain before letting it dry.

For my clear finish, I selected the spray version of Minwax® Clear Aerosol Lacquer, which dries in just a matter of minutes. After it did, I assembled my two-board magazine stand simply by slipping the two notches together. No nails, no screws, and no glue required!

The finished product compliments our couch perfectly, and gives me a handy way to display my magazines close by.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

Turning a Dingy Dining Table into Something Awesome with MyFixitUpLife

By: Guest Blogger

This week’s guest blog comes from Mark of MyFixitUpLife. See how Mark was able to make his wife, Theresa’s, table pallet idea come to life.

Finished pallet table

The carpenter in me always has to do a gut-check when my designer-wife says, I have pallet ideas. Oh no, I say. Then three things happen…

I love her, I trust her, and as a guy pretty much wandering around lost on the path less traveled, I swallow hard and try to find a way to make her vision come alive.

With the table done—we did this as part of the Minwax® “Made With Love. Finished With Minwax®. program we’re lucky to be part of—now I am amped to show you how this thing happened.

It started with a table that was pretty much a mess. Theresa liked the shape, but the finish was jumping off it, it was hard to keep clean, the leaves didn’t work right. You know, a mess.

Table Before

Doing the reverse gymnastics of taking the table top off the base is minimal fun. I found that I had to be really careful to not strip the screws.

Mark under the table

Pallets look good in photos, but in real life, they’re like a quarter you find on the street. You don’t know where they’ve been. So before assembling the table top, we applied a coat of Minwax® Polycrylic® Protective Finish to seal the boards.

Mark applying Minwax Polycrylic

We still wanted to be able to fold down the table leaves, so I set the first board tight to the hinged seam. A pneumatic finish nailer with 1-inch nails was awesome for this job. You could also use a pneumatic stapler—a tool I love enough to write a poem about—but the nails looked better.

Placing the first board on the table

Sometimes you need to remove a bent nail or a nail that is sitting too high (in carpenter lingo, that’s called ‘proud’). My go-to tool for this is often my diagonal cutting (dikes) pliers. Once you pull nails with these you’ll never go back to how you used to do it.

Removing a nail with pliers

We left most of the nails in the pallet wood. However, some were a problem so we took them out. In addition to the pliers, another option for dealing with nasty nails is to drive them—or at least get them started—out from the back side with a hammer and nail set.

Removing a nail by hammering

I sometimes complain that my wife makes things too complicated. I can be accused of the same thing. I got inspired to add—and then notch around—a center square to shake up the texture. I’m glad I did it.

Center square piece

Sometimes pallet ideas becoming pallet reality requires a little hacking. Since we really wanted to hide the old table top beneath this new texture and color, I chose to straighten some of the really warped pallet wood boards on the table saw.

Cutting pallet edges on a table saw

By flipping the table top upside down, I was able to use it as a guide for my jigsaw. It’s a little tricky to get perfect. Slow and steady wins the race. Don’t force the saw. Take your time and let the saw do the work. And use a sharp blade.

Using the table to guide cutting

I wire-brushed the table top before applying color. It was the absolute perfect solution (this one is a Hyde Tools wire brush, that also has a scraper on it) for opening the grain, dislodging dirt and cleaning up little pieces of glue left over from the nail gun nails. Make sure to clean the dust and debris off after wire brushing. I used a whisk broom for this. Easy.

Scouring the boards with a wire brush

I wire-brushed the table top before applying color. It was the absolute perfect solution (this one is a Hyde Tools wire brush, that also has a scraper on it) for opening the grain, dislodging dirt and cleaning up little pieces of glue left over from the nail gun nails. Make sure to clean the dust and debris off after wire brushing. I used a whisk broom for this. Easy.

Staining with Minwax in Antique Jade

That’s a real smile! Theresa jammed Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain in Antique Jade on this and it is clear to me why she is the designer and I am the carpenter.

The stain went on smooth, dried quickly and the brush was easy to clean with soap and water.

Pallet Ideas Tip: For rough-textured stock like pallet wood, I like to work the brush back and forth to help the stain cover evenly.

Staining the side of the table

Let’s talk about Minwax® Clear Brushing Lacquer, OK. It is one-quart of clear coating awesome. It set up in about 30-minutes, so I could zing two coats on in a day and the clear gloss finish…yeah, love affair.

Brushing on Minwax lacquer

We couldn’t add new wood to the table base and the factory finish was impenetrable. And it, too, was a mess like the table top so—again proving why she’s the designer and I’m Nicky Nail Gun—Theresa chose Krylon Chalky Finish New Leaf spray paint. It’s a perfect match for the table top and easy to apply to a multi-faceted assembly like this base.

Using Krylon to paint the table base

And that’s really about it for this pallet ideas project. A few things I’d recommend thinking about: Once you add the pallet wood to the table top, it’s heavy, so help moving it might be necessary. Also, with the lacquer, make sure to brush it nicely into the edges to get good coverage. And, get some lacquer thinner or acetone to clean your brush.

Staining the edge of the table

MyFixitUpLife shares design inspiration, DIY tips, and behind-the-scenes interviews MyFixitUpLife’s husband-and-wife duo, Mark & Theresa, design, renovate, and share how-to tips to make your projects easier and more fun.

A Barn Rescue

Nearly 20 years ago, I filmed several woodworking shows for HGTV, including one on how to make this mahogany Federal-style table. One of the two versions I made ended up stored in my barn, where I came across it last week and decided it deserved a better fate — provided I could find the drawers, too!

The safest, most effective way to remove 20 years of grime was with a spray bottle of Minwax® Wood Cabinet Cleaner, which quickly released the beauty of the mahogany from layers of dirt.

After the Wood Cabinet Cleaner had dried, I could see that the mahogany had lost some of its natural color, which I replaced with a coat of Minwax® Wood Finish Stain (“Gunstock”). After letting it soak in for five minutes, I then wiped off any stain the wood did not absorb.

This style of furniture would have originally had a glossy protective coating, which I could easily duplicate with Minwax® Clear Aerosol Lacquer. Here you can see the first of three coats I applied.

Fortunately for my nephew and niece, Leigh Ann and I don’t have a place for this table (which explains why it was in the barn!), so its going to be a surprise addition to their new home, all of which goes to prove that hidden under layers of dirt and grime, beautiful wood is waiting to be released, restored, and re-used!

Until next time,

Find your next hidden treasure!

Bruce

 

A Small Storage Box

Not every project has to be a big project. Last week I needed a small storage box that had to be a specific size to fit my available space. Rather than spend hours searching stores for a plastic bin, I quickly cut some half-inch birch plywood I had on hand and nailed together this simple box.

After a quick, light sanding and wiping off the dust, I reached for a can of Minwax® Clear Brushing Lacquer, which I knew would dry very quickly, and would give my storage box all of the protection it would need.

I love how the clear Lacquer brings out the grain and natural color of the wood! After the first coat dried, I sanded it lightly with #220-grit sandpaper and brushed on a final coat.

I added this old copper pull I had in my workshop to complete my storage box, which looks better than a plastic tub and certainly will last years longer!

Until next time,

Measure twice, saw once!

Bruce