Category Archives: Clear Lacquer Finish

Making Those Missing Shelves

You may recall that I recently transformed a discarded 1990s microwave cart into this rolling serving center. However, each time I looked at the inside of the doors all I could see was the opportunity to add a pair of shelves to them.

So, I picked up some half-inch thick oak boards from my local home improvement center, then cut them to fit the inside of each door.

These thin boards were easy to glue and nail together, but I was left with some unsightly nail holes. To fill them, I squeezed in a small amount of Minwax® Stainable Wood Filler, which I sanded smooth as soon as it dried.

To match the rest of the serving center, I left the oak boards natural, but sealed and protected them using Minwax® Clear Aerosol Lacquer.

The lacquer dried quickly and it was easy to attach my shelves to the inside of the doors with small L-brackets positioned under each of the two shelves. Now when I open the doors, I no longer see a missed opportunity!

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

A Rolling Holiday Serving Cart

The holidays are always a time for parties, so when I took a closer look at this 1990s rolling microwave cart Leigh Ann had been using to pot plants in our garage, I got an idea.

All it had was a thin natural finish over the birch boards, so a light sanding with #150-grit sandpaper quickly removed it, along with the unsightly water marks.

Inside the cabinet was a single shelf and an open storage area, which I decided to use for a wine rack. Needing just four boards, it was easy to cut and nail together.

Under the shelf, I wanted to hang glasses. Using some scrap wood, I made some simple glass racks.

Birch boards always look great when kept natural, so I knew this was an ideal project to finish with four coats of Minwax® Clear Aerosol Lacquer. Note: see how I have my garage door open for ventilation? You can see, too, how the Aerosol Lacquer brings out the natural rich color of the wood.

Remember those dated round, white porcelain knobs? I replaced them with a more contemporary pair of square knobs.

When I was done, the rolling cart looked like this when closed….

And like this when open. The white center section is the original formica, after I scrubbed off the dirt from Leigh Ann’s potting projects. And in case you want a closer look at the interior….

Here it is.

So, the next time you are out hitting the thrift shops, keep an eye out for an out-dated kitchen cart you can easily transform into a contemporary serving cart.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

An Antique Mirror Restoration Made Simple

1. Before

While it may not look so bad from a distance, this 1950s maple mirror had originally been finished with lacquer, a popular finish for mid-century furniture. Unfortunately, this early version of lacquer tended to develop tiny cracks and blemishes over time. Fortunately for us, they don’t have to be stripped for the mirror to be saved and reused.

2. Scuff

I started by scuffing the old lacquer lightly with a synthetic pad, then wiping off the dust.

3. Lacquer

I then simply added a fresh coat of Minwax® Clear Aerosol Lacquer, which adheres best to the old lacquer.

4. Wire

Quick Tip: Never trust old wire or hooks on a heavy mirror or work of art. Always be sure to screw in a new hook and use heavy-duty braided wire.

5. HeroBefore I could get it hung on the wall, Jasper decided to take a quick peek to see how he was looking that day. Both he and the mirror look pretty good!

Be sure to check out Minwax’s new “Made With Love. Finished With Minwax.” campaign currently going on. The theme is ‘Find. Finish. Love.,’ celebrating the thrill of finding real wood pieces – sometimes in the least expected places – and the joy of making them into something we love.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

Restore a Foggy or Cloudy Skylight

Opening

For years, the skylight in our bedroom has had a permanent foggy appearance. But aside from looking unsightly, there was no reason to undergo the expense of a new one. So when I spotted this large stained glass window in an antique shop, I got an idea.

NotchesThe window’s frame was falling apart, so I removed it and made a simple oak lap-joint frame, cutting the notches using a hand saw and a chisel before gluing them together.

Test While the glue dried, I applied three different Minwax® Wood Finish™ stains in different colors– Natural, Golden Pecan, and Golden Oak to a piece of scrap oak, then held it up against the skylight to see which would be the best match.

Can As it turns out, the Minwax “Golden Pecan” Wood Finish came very close.

Stain I applied my stain, let it soak in for a few minutes, then wiped off the excess stain before letting it dry.

Plugs Afterwards I drilled a shallow half-inch hole in each lap-joint for the screws that would secure the stain glass window to two strips of wood I installed inside the skylight. The wood buttons hide the screw heads and give the frame a bit of decoration.

Lacquer Frames like this one are ideal projects for Minwax® Clear Aerosol Lacquer. Just a couple of thin coats provide all the protection the oak will need, and the lacquer dries in just a matter of minutes.

HeroWhile the antique stained glass window and my new frame didn’t fill the entire skylight, it certainly made it look much better, giving it some vintage character and a little extra color.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce