Category Archives: Frames

Geometric Wall Art

I like nothing more than being able to make something that looks both complicated and expensive out of inexpensive materials — such as 1″ x 2″ strips of common pine. I started my wall art project by making a simple frame to fill a section of wall in our family room.

I then began experimenting with different lengths of 1″ x 2″ boards, cutting the ends at a 45-degree angle before both gluing and holding them together with finish nails.

With several pieces to stain and finish, I decided to use the aerosol version of Minwax® Polyshades®, which provides both stain color and a polyurethane finish at the same time. For this project I alternated boards finished with “Mission Oak,” “Classic Black,” and “Pecan.” Quick Tip:  it is easiest to stain each board before you attach it to the frame.

To keep my spacing uniform between each of the slats, I slipped in spacers of wood scraps before nailing each 1″ x 2″ board to the frame.

And while at first glance my wall art looks both complicated and expensive, it really was easy and fun to make.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

DIY Holiday Frame Gifts

The holidays are a time for pictures, and for those special handmade gifts that people cherish for years. So, why not combine the two?

Large commercial frames, however, are expensive, and cutting the notch in the back of each board requires a table saw or router. But I have found a way to avoid needing woodworking equipment — or paying high prices for large store-bought frames.

At most home improvement centers you can find 2’ and 4’ lengths of oak, pine and poplar boards in various thicknesses. By laying a narrow strip over a wider one, then tacking them together, you can create a notched board designed to hold the glass, your image and the backing.

After assembling this oak frame, I decided to stain it a holiday color, using Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain in “Green Tea.”

I applied the stain with a brush, then used a cloth to wipe off any stain the wood did not absorb.

Finally, I sealed the stain with the aerosol version of clear Minwax® Polycrylic® Protective Finish. The great thing about Minwax® Polycrylic® Protective Finish is that it dries in just minutes.

Which means it was ready to hang the same day.

I also made this frame, stained with Minwax® Wood Finish in “English Chestnut,” and decorated with holiday stickers I found at my local craft store.

So many frames, so many choices!

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

 

 

A Unique House-Warming Gift

1. Parts

I have friends who just moved into a new house in Cleveland, so I thought a special house-warming gift would be in order. For me, that means a stop by my local craft store, where I picked up a few items.

2. White Stain

I started by staining a piece of birch plywood with Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain in “Pure White,” applying it with a foam brush, then wiping off any stain the wood did not absorb.

3. Gel

For my trim and wooden letters, I selected Minwax® Gel Stain  in “Coffee” to achieve a pleasing contrast to my white plywood. Once dry, I glued the letters to the plywood.

5. Ohio 2

I then cut out and traced an outline of the state of Ohio onto the plywood, isolated it with blue painter’s tape, and dabbed on a layer of Gel Stain using a foam brush. As soon as I had completed the staining, I peeled off the tape.

6. Poly

I found this cute red heart in my craft store, so I glued it to my state to represent the city of Cleveland. Then I finished the entire wall plaque with Minwax® Polycrylic™ Protective Finish.

Hero

When it was all done, I had a special housewarming gift that they can hang in any room of their house.

Be sure to check out Minwax’s new “Made With Love. Finished With Minwax.” campaign currently going on. The theme is ‘Find. Finish. Love.,’ celebrating the thrill of finding real wood pieces – sometimes in the least expected places – and the joy of making them into something we love.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

 

An Antique Mirror Restoration Made Simple

1. Before

While it may not look so bad from a distance, this 1950s maple mirror had originally been finished with lacquer, a popular finish for mid-century furniture. Unfortunately, this early version of lacquer tended to develop tiny cracks and blemishes over time. Fortunately for us, they don’t have to be stripped for the mirror to be saved and reused.

2. Scuff

I started by scuffing the old lacquer lightly with a synthetic pad, then wiping off the dust.

3. Lacquer

I then simply added a fresh coat of Minwax® Clear Aerosol Lacquer, which adheres best to the old lacquer.

4. Wire

Quick Tip: Never trust old wire or hooks on a heavy mirror or work of art. Always be sure to screw in a new hook and use heavy-duty braided wire.

5. HeroBefore I could get it hung on the wall, Jasper decided to take a quick peek to see how he was looking that day. Both he and the mirror look pretty good!

Be sure to check out Minwax’s new “Made With Love. Finished With Minwax.” campaign currently going on. The theme is ‘Find. Finish. Love.,’ celebrating the thrill of finding real wood pieces – sometimes in the least expected places – and the joy of making them into something we love.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce