Category Archives: Frames

A Unique House-Warming Gift

1. Parts

I have friends who just moved into a new house in Cleveland, so I thought a special house-warming gift would be in order. For me, that means a stop by my local craft store, where I picked up a few items.

2. White Stain

I started by staining a piece of birch plywood with Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain in “Pure White,” applying it with a foam brush, then wiping off any stain the wood did not absorb.

3. Gel

For my trim and wooden letters, I selected Minwax® Gel Stain  in “Coffee” to achieve a pleasing contrast to my white plywood. Once dry, I glued the letters to the plywood.

5. Ohio 2

I then cut out and traced an outline of the state of Ohio onto the plywood, isolated it with blue painter’s tape, and dabbed on a layer of Gel Stain using a foam brush. As soon as I had completed the staining, I peeled off the tape.

6. Poly

I found this cute red heart in my craft store, so I glued it to my state to represent the city of Cleveland. Then I finished the entire wall plaque with Minwax® Polycrylic™ Protective Finish.

Hero

When it was all done, I had a special housewarming gift that they can hang in any room of their house.

Be sure to check out Minwax’s new “Made With Love. Finished With Minwax.” campaign currently going on. The theme is ‘Find. Finish. Love.,’ celebrating the thrill of finding real wood pieces – sometimes in the least expected places – and the joy of making them into something we love.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

 

An Antique Mirror Restoration Made Simple

1. Before

While it may not look so bad from a distance, this 1950s maple mirror had originally been finished with lacquer, a popular finish for mid-century furniture. Unfortunately, this early version of lacquer tended to develop tiny cracks and blemishes over time. Fortunately for us, they don’t have to be stripped for the mirror to be saved and reused.

2. Scuff

I started by scuffing the old lacquer lightly with a synthetic pad, then wiping off the dust.

3. Lacquer

I then simply added a fresh coat of Minwax® Clear Aerosol Lacquer, which adheres best to the old lacquer.

4. Wire

Quick Tip: Never trust old wire or hooks on a heavy mirror or work of art. Always be sure to screw in a new hook and use heavy-duty braided wire.

5. HeroBefore I could get it hung on the wall, Jasper decided to take a quick peek to see how he was looking that day. Both he and the mirror look pretty good!

Be sure to check out Minwax’s new “Made With Love. Finished With Minwax.” campaign currently going on. The theme is ‘Find. Finish. Love.,’ celebrating the thrill of finding real wood pieces – sometimes in the least expected places – and the joy of making them into something we love.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

Create a Special Clock for Any Young Athlete

1. Raw

When I spotted this unfinished panel and frame in my local craft store, I had an idea for combining them into a clock. I started by drilling a small hole in the center of the panel for the clock shaft, then gave the wood a light sanding.

2. GrayFor me, two separate pieces means two different colors. I stained the square panel with Minwax® Wood Finish™ in “Classic Gray,” wiping off the excess stain to allow the grain to show with just a light gray tint.

3. Blue

I then used Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain in “Navy Blue” to stain the frame.

4. Poly

After the stain dried, I protected the wood with a few coats of Minwax® Polycrylic™ Protective Finish.  Once completely dried, I then attached the “Navy Blue” frame to the “Classic Gray” panel with glue and finish nails.

5. NUmbers

Rather than use traditional numbers, I pressed on self-adhesive baseball decals, then slipped the clock hands over the shaft.

6. Hero

Not only did I have fun being creative with my clock design, I also now have a unique gift to give to a young athlete I know.

Be sure to check out Minwax’s new “Made With Love. Finished With Minwax.” campaign currently going on. The theme is ‘Find. Finish. Love.,’ celebrating the thrill of finding real wood pieces – sometimes in the least expected places – and the joy of making them into something we love.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

The Easiest DIY Picture Frame Made With Love

By: Guest Blogger

This week’s guest blog is from Jen of City Farmhouse. Create your own picture frame by following her tutorial.

Easy DIY Frame With Large Photo

Family photos can bring life and meaning into a home, they can tell a story & make an ordinary space feel loved and appreciated. A few summers ago I had an amazing photographer friend of mine, Michele Kats, take photos of my family & I at the beach. It was a place I spent a lot of time as a child, as did my father and then my own boys when we moved back from Colorado. I felt so blessed leaving the session, before even knowing what they would look like. These memories continue to be a gift for us as we cherish looking at them each and every time. I have printed a few here & there but to be honest I have always wanted to do something bigger with them.

I am excited to be partnering with Minwax® on this post as part of their Made With Love campaign. Today I am going to show you how your family photos can become art & a beautiful focal point in any space, along with a really easy way to create a DIY frame. The fun thing about this project, I brought a beautiful memory that spans 3 generations into my home and did it all for under $50.

Let’s get started. You will need…

DIY Frame What You'll Need

  • 4 wood pieces cut to size – I bought 2- 5/8″ x 36″ poplar square rods and a 6 ft piece of pine screen door molding which I cut to size. For a 30″ x 30″ print I then had 4 lengths of wood that were all 31″ long, 2 poplar and 2 pine.
  • stain – I used Minwax® Wood Finish™ in Early American & Driftwood
  • foam brush or cotton cloth
  • photo/print– Mine was 30″ x 30″ (from Nations Photo Lab)
  • box saw
  • measuring tape
  • nails – 3/4 x 18
  • pencil
  • sandpaper
  • jute
  • plastic gloves
  • drop cloth
  1. I cut 2 poplar pieces and 2 pine screen door molding pieces all to 31″. I wanted the frame to hang 1/2″ on either side of my print which was 30″. I used a box saw and some sand paper to smooth the edges.

Easy DIY Frame With Large Photo with Tools Needed

2. Time to stain. Be sure to use plastic gloves and have proper ventilation. I used Minwax® Wood Finish™ in the Driftwood color first, then after it was dry I used a cloth to layer on, very unevenly, the Early American color. This gave a weathered look.

Easy DIY Frame With Large Photo-Minwax Driftwood

 

  1. Lay your print on a flat surface face down. I did the bottom frame first. The square poplar piece is what will be visual from the front, so lay that under the bottom edge. I measured so both sides were even.

Easy DIY Frame With Large Photo-Measuring

  1. Once it was even I taped the print so it would stay in place. I then added the pine piece on top, this piece will not be visible from the front.

Easy DIY Frame With Large Photo-Using Tape

  1. I used thin nails to secure the back piece – the pine to the poplar piece. I used a total of 5 for the bottom and 5 for the top.

Easy DIY Frame With Large Photo-Use Small Nails To Secure

This is what it will look like from the front.Easy DIY Frame With Large Photo-What It Looks Like From The Top

  1. You will do the same for the top and add jute for hanging. I measured 3″ from either side and tied a knot at the end.

Easy DIY Frame With Large Photo-Hanging it

Simple right?! Here is how it looks when you walk in my backdoor mudroom.

Easy DIY Frame With Large Photo-Mudroom Vignette

Easy DIY Frame With Large Photo-Summer Mudroom

Easy DIY Frame With Large Photo-Full View

The Easiest DIY Picture Frame. You can check out more beautiful Made With Love projects over at Not JUST a Housewife blog & Thrifty Décor Chick blog.

You can go HERE for more information and watch this BEAUTIFUL video.

Jen shares DIY projects and thrifty decorating solutions. Her design philosophy is that bringing style to your home doesn’t have to break the bank. Learn more about Jen and visit City Farmhouse. You Can also follow her on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.