Category Archives: Wipe-On Poly

Get Organized with This Cherry Bookstand

Several years ago I made a simple cherry book rack for a television series I was shooting for the DIY network. This was one that I never finished, but had stowed away in a storage tub. I decided it was certainly worth finishing and giving to my son Blake, who is still in school.

Since cherry is a hardwood with a subtle grain, I only used #180-grit sandpaper, as anything coarse would leave swirling scratch marks in the wood.

My all-time favorite finish for cherry is a penetrating oil, such as Minwax® Wipe-On Poly, that I rub into the wood.

As you can see, the Wipe On Poly brings out the grain of the cherry, while giving it that hand-rubbed appearance we love to see.

It only took two coats to protect the wood and leave a satin sheen, making this a perfect desktop book rack for anyone you know. This one measures 11″ high by 8″ deep by 13″ wide, but you can make yours whatever size fits your space – and can draw the curve in whatever manner you like.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

Create a Table from Vintage Crates

Anytime I see a stack of old shipping crates, or even just one, my mind starts thinking about possible ways to re-purpose them while still maintaining their vintage look.

I typically start by making sure the nails are snug, the metal won’t snag anything, and the wood and lettering is protected by a coat of satin Minwax® Wipe-On Poly.

For this project I picked up a pre-glued, round, unfinished top, then stained it using Minwax® Wood Finish™ in Classic Gray. After the stain dried, I sealed the top with two coats of Minwax® Fast-Drying Polyurethane.

All it then took was a wood screw through the inside of the crate to secure the top in place. I then slipped it into the house and put it beside our couch to hold glasses, coffee mugs, magazines, and pottery.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

Keep Track of Time with This Rustic Clock

I was breezing through my local craft store the other day when I spotted the parts for a project I have always wanted to make: a battery-powered wall clock made from a smooth slab of a tree trunk. Both were on sale, so, of course, I couldn’t resist.

To begin, I flipped it over and drilled a hole for the shaft, then also used a drill bit to remove enough wood for the clock works to be recessed inside the slab.

To keep it as natural looking as possible, I drilled shallow 3/8-inch holes for just three “numbers,” then tapped a short dowel into each before sanding it smooth with 180-grit sandpaper.

I knew the perfect finish for my clock would be Minwax® Wipe-On Poly, which seals the wood to prevent it from cracking, but which also looks very natural.

The clock parts simply screwed together, so in no time at all (sorry for the bad pun) I had a new clock hanging on my wall — as well as a great and inexpensive gift idea for anyone who appreciates wood.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

Coasters to Match Your Style Using Scraps

Not every reclaimed pallet wood project has to be a giant one, as I discovered when I was looking for ways to use up some some scrap pieces. After cutting them into 1.5-inch wide strips, I began playing around with different designs, gluing and tacking the strips to plywood squares with finish nails to make drink coasters and trivets to protect our coffee table.

I then added four more pieces to create a frame around each coaster. The frame hides the ends of the strips and the edges of the plywood underneath them.

A quick sanding with #120-grit sandpaper eliminated any roughness and rounded any sharp edges in preparation for a finish.

If you like a natural look, I suggest rubbing on two or three coats of  Minwax® Wipe-On Poly, which protects the wood and brings out the beauty of the grain, even on old pallet boards! (Notice the two nail heads I purposely left in the pallet boards?)

I also made a couple of larger trivets using scraps of new wood leftover from previous projects. Small projects like these are ideal for Minwax® Wood Finishing Cloths, which provide both a water-based stain and finish combined in a pre-moistened cloth. I selected “Maple” and simply rubbed it into the wood, then wiped off the excess before letting it dry. (PS – The gloves are included with each package of eight cloths!)

Naturally, I couldn’t resist testing the drink coaster in my workshop. Here you can see the contrast between the pallet wood (left) under a clear finish and the new wood (right) under a combination one-step stain and finish. Do you prefer one style over the other?

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce