Category Archives: Wood Finish Stain

Glass Light Shade Vase: Three Ways with Not JUST a Housewife

By: Guest Blogger

Guest blogger Stacy Risenmay of Not JUST A Housewife is back with a chic, whimsical DIY solution for displaying your summer flowers. Follow her tutorial and see how to create your own glass light shade vase.

When I finished the bathroom in the basement, we couldn’t do recessed lights because of all the pipes and such in the ceiling. I had to find light that didn’t hang down very far from the ceiling since the ceiling is lower in the basement than upstairs and I have a tall husband. I have a love affair with seeded glass (glass with bubbles) and so I ordered some seeded glass light shades online. I ended up with an extra one and it has been sitting on the window ledge for almost two years collecting dust. Every time I get in the shower, I see it sitting there and think that I should do something with it. I decided to make a vase out of it but never got around to it since I could not decide on which base idea to create. Well, this week I decided to make all three and see which one I liked best!

seeded-glass-light-shade

Ever since my first trip to Trader Joe’s a couple weeks ago, I have been wanting to go back for some more fresh flowers. A post about vases was the perfect excuse! It is probably a good thing it is an hour away or I would spend most of my money there.

 Vase 1: Hanging Vase

This first vase I decided to make round. You could make it any shape you want really. After tracing a bowl on the wood, I cut out the 9 inch circle. I then traced another circle in the center. It was 4 inches. Drill a hole large enough that your jigsaw blade can fit then use the jigsaw to cut out the center circle. Be sure to sand it all really well with a 220 grit sandpaper.

drill-hole-for-jig-saw-blade-to-fit

I stained it the same color as the peg board and boxes in my new office closet. I love it!

stain-wood-base

Once the stain was dry, I drilled three small holes evenly around the circle and threaded faux leather lacing through it. I knotted the ends so it wouldn’t pull back through the small holes.

hanging-vase-leather-straps

I still can’t believe these giant sunflowers were only a few bucks at Trader Joe’s!

hanging-vase-with-sunflowers

 

Vase 2: Gold Legs

For this one, I cut out an 8 inch by 8 inch square. I traced a 5 inch circle in the center. Just like the one above, I drilled a hole big enough for the jigsaw blade to fit. I cut out the hole and sanded the whole thing really well.

I had a 1 inch wooden dowel I was going to use for the legs so I used a 1 inch drill bit to drill holes in each corner. Measure and mark it before drilling.

I cut the dowel into 2 1/2 inch pieces for the legs. I didn’t want to too tall, but it needed to be just tall enough that the bottom of the vase wouldn’t touch the table top. Think pot bellied pig verses gangly teenage boy.

drill-holes-for-legs

I stained it using Minwax® Wood Finish in “Early American.” The legs I spray painted gold. I added some wood glue and pushed the legs into the holes. I waited for the glue to dry before turning it over and adding the vase.

vase-with-stand

I love that you can see the legs on the top!

vase-with-gold-legs

I ended up liking the 5 inch size hole better than the 4 inch hole.

flower-vase-with-gold-legs

 

Vase 3: Geometric!

I started out by cutting three 8 inch squares out of plywood. You can use any wood, I just chose to use scrap wood for these vases. Once I had the square cut, I measured and marked about an inch and a half from each corner, drew a line, and using the miter saw chopped off the corners. It helps to have clamps to hold the wood in pace on the base of the saw. This created the octagonal shape.

Like the hanging vase, I drilled a large hole for the saw blade to fit through. I used the jigsaw to cut out a center circle in two of the pieces.

drill-hole-for-saw-blade-to-fit-and-then-cut-out-center

You will end up with two pieces that have center circles and one that does not. You can either use wood glue to attach them together or a brad nailer. Putty it really well and when dry, sand it smooth.

 

pieces-for-geometric-vase

I painted it my favorite cobalt blue!

 

paint-the-vase

It looks so cheery on the shelf!

geometric-vase

 

Real gerbera daisies are so perfect that they look fake even in person! They are such a great cut flower.

 

geometric-vase-with-gerber-daisies

Be sure to check out Minwax’s new “Made With Love. Finished With Minwax.” campaign currently going on. The theme is ‘Find. Finish. Love.,’ celebrating the thrill of finding real wood pieces – sometimes in the least expected places – and the joy of making them into something we love.

Stacy Risenmay is a DIY enthusiast. In her blog, Not Just a Housewife, she shares her adventures of fixing up her 1938 cottage. She believes that whether it’s big or small, everyone should love their space. Learn more about Stacy and visit: http://www.notjustahousewife.net/about. You can also follow Stacy on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram

 

A One of a Kind Table Top Clock

1. Hole

I saw this fifteen-inch, unfinished table top at my local home improvement center and it occurred to me that by drilling a hole in the center, I could transform it into a unique clock.

2. Drill back

Before I put my drill away, I used it to cut away enough wood on the back for my battery-powered clock component.

3. Cans

Since pine is a soft wood, I opted to first brush on a coat of Minwax® Pre-Stain Wood Conditioner. This helps reduce the blotchiness when I applied my stain. For this project I choose “Classic Gray” Minwax® Wood Finish™.

4. Gray I gave the stain about five to ten minutes to soak in, then wiped off all the excess.

5. Ring Hands

Just to add a splash of color, I stained this wooden ring with Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain “Crimson.” I then glued it onto the clock face and assembled the hands of the clock.

Hero

Regular numbers seemed a little mundane, so I opted for these colorful self-adhesive stickers instead, making my clock even more unique.

Be sure to check out Minwax’s new “Made With Love. Finished With Minwax.” campaign currently going on. The theme is ‘Find. Finish. Love.,’ celebrating the thrill of finding real wood pieces – sometimes in the least expected places – and the joy of making them into something we love.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

Create a Special Clock for Any Young Athlete

1. Raw

When I spotted this unfinished panel and frame in my local craft store, I had an idea for combining them into a clock. I started by drilling a small hole in the center of the panel for the clock shaft, then gave the wood a light sanding.

2. GrayFor me, two separate pieces means two different colors. I stained the square panel with Minwax® Wood Finish™ in “Classic Gray,” wiping off the excess stain to allow the grain to show with just a light gray tint.

3. Blue

I then used Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain in “Navy Blue” to stain the frame.

4. Poly

After the stain dried, I protected the wood with a few coats of Minwax® Polycrylic™ Protective Finish.  Once completely dried, I then attached the “Navy Blue” frame to the “Classic Gray” panel with glue and finish nails.

5. NUmbers

Rather than use traditional numbers, I pressed on self-adhesive baseball decals, then slipped the clock hands over the shaft.

6. Hero

Not only did I have fun being creative with my clock design, I also now have a unique gift to give to a young athlete I know.

Be sure to check out Minwax’s new “Made With Love. Finished With Minwax.” campaign currently going on. The theme is ‘Find. Finish. Love.,’ celebrating the thrill of finding real wood pieces – sometimes in the least expected places – and the joy of making them into something we love.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

Restore a Foggy or Cloudy Skylight

Opening

For years, the skylight in our bedroom has had a permanent foggy appearance. But aside from looking unsightly, there was no reason to undergo the expense of a new one. So when I spotted this large stained glass window in an antique shop, I got an idea.

NotchesThe window’s frame was falling apart, so I removed it and made a simple oak lap-joint frame, cutting the notches using a hand saw and a chisel before gluing them together.

Test While the glue dried, I applied three different Minwax® Wood Finish™ stains in different colors– Natural, Golden Pecan, and Golden Oak to a piece of scrap oak, then held it up against the skylight to see which would be the best match.

Can As it turns out, the Minwax “Golden Pecan” Wood Finish came very close.

Stain I applied my stain, let it soak in for a few minutes, then wiped off the excess stain before letting it dry.

Plugs Afterwards I drilled a shallow half-inch hole in each lap-joint for the screws that would secure the stain glass window to two strips of wood I installed inside the skylight. The wood buttons hide the screw heads and give the frame a bit of decoration.

Lacquer Frames like this one are ideal projects for Minwax® Clear Aerosol Lacquer. Just a couple of thin coats provide all the protection the oak will need, and the lacquer dries in just a matter of minutes.

HeroWhile the antique stained glass window and my new frame didn’t fill the entire skylight, it certainly made it look much better, giving it some vintage character and a little extra color.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce