Category Archives: Water Based Wood Stain

Herringbone Wood Headboard with Jenni from I SPY DIY

By: Guest Blogger

Minwax® has partnered with Jenni Radosevich of I SPY DIY. Her mantra is “spot style you love, and do-it-yourself.” See how she created this incredible herringbone headboard in no time at all.

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The concept of the herringbone pattern is pretty simple, but I thought there might be some challenges turning it into a headboard. I was beyond happy when this project ended up being easier and way less time consuming than I thought; and turned out even better then I hoped! The guys at the hardware store were skeptical when I showed them the inspiration pic and told them I planned on finishing it in a day. But all the cutting/staining/gluing only took about three hours. Then, I let the glue set over night and spent around two hours the next day adding the frame and poly coats. I made the accent color using Minwax® Water-Based Wood Stain in ‘Pearl Gray”, but you can switch it up to match the decor in your bedroom. All the supplies cost $150 dollars, which is pretty darn good for a custom headboard!

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What you’ll need: 
Plywood 4 x 8ft. 1/3 in. thick – for a queen bed cut to 70 in. x 48 in.
7/8in X 3in – 8FT Cedar Boards (18 boards)
7/8in X 2in -8FT Cedar Board (4 boards)
1 Quart Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain – Pearl Gray
1 Quart Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain – White Wash Pickling 
Minwax® Polycrylic™ Protective Finish 
Wood Glue (3 bottles)
2 inch wood screws
Paint brush
Clamps
Drill
Miter saw
Circular saw

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I did a bit of guesstimating at the hardware store and bought 18 – 8 ft. pieces of 3 in. cedar. After factoring in a few bad cuts, I had the perfect amount of wood. If you did some more math, you could probably save some money with 12 ft. pieces, but math hurts my brain…
Now time to blast your music and start cutting! Using your miter saw, cut the cedar to 18 in. pieces. After cutting each board down, I laid the pieces on the plywood backing. Place the pieces to create 90 degree angles (butt joints), that repeat to create a vertical herringbone pattern. Once I got to the ends, I cut smaller pieces making sure that all of the plywood backing was covered.

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Once all of the pieces were in place, I picked out every third one, brushed it lightly with the Pearl Gray, then set it back into place. Then, I picked out some random ones to stain white. I also flipped some of the raw cedar to show the rough side, and others to show the smooth side, to get a lot of different colors and texture. Doing it this way went a lot faster then I thought, and lets you really make sure you’re getting that unplanned, yet perfect, look!

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I experimented with ‘Slate’ and ‘Pearl Gray’ stain. I planned to use both, but ended up just using the ‘Pearl Gray’ and ‘White Wash Pickling’ because I did not want the headboard to look too busy. The ‘Slate’ is gorgeous though, and I can’t wait to use it on another project!

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On some of the white washed pieces, I used a super thin layer on the rough side of the cedar, and I LOVE how the wood peeked through. On other pieces, I added a second coat so they would be whiter.

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Once your stain is dry to the touch, you can start gluing down the pieces. My brother-in-law came up with the brilliant idea of using his nail gun to secure a zig-zag down the middle as a guideline. Then I worked my way out on both sides, making sure the pattern stayed straight and covered the plywood.

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Unfortunately, I don’t have a pic of the next step because I was holding down the wood while my Bro-in-law used a circular saw to cut off all the wood that hung over the plywood; but clamped down a piece of wood along the edge and then ran the circular saw along it to make a straight cut. Next, I created the frame by measuring each side and making 45 degree miter cuts. I did this by making a 45 degree cut on one side, then lined the short end up to one corner, marked the other corner, then cut. I clamped the frame pieces to the headboard and drilled in 2 in. wood screws around the perimeter to secure the frame.

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The final step was adding a Polycrylic™ Protective Finish, which was a game changer. It brought out all the beautiful colors of the cedar! Make sure to brush it on, in the direction of grain, then let dry completely.

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Securing the newly completed headboard to the wall was a two woman job. We propped it on top of the bed frame to get the right height; then using a stud finder, we then drilled eight screws through the headboard and into the studs to make sure it would stay put on the wall, and voila!

Can’t wait to see your version!

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For more of Jenni’s DIY projects. Check out her blog I SPY DIY and follow her on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

Take Gardening Indoors and Create a Wall Garden with MyFixItUpLife

By: Guest Blogger

April is Minwax National Woodworking Month®! Download the Minwax National Woodworking Month® mail-in rebate form and you could save up to $17 on select Minwax® products. 

Guest Blogger Theresa of MyFixItUpLife is back with a great project allowing you to show off your green thumb inside your home. Follow her step-by-step instructions to learn how to create this gorgeous indoor wall garden to put your succulents on display.

Enjoying pretty little plants can be a year-round pleasure with a custom-stained pallet indoor wall garden.

1-measure-succulents-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-ArtThe size of the succulents dictated the size of this indoor wall garden.

I’ve been a little obsessed with making projects from pallets and finding new ways to display succulents around my home. Those little bulbous plants are so perfect for a busy family lifestyle, as they don’t require much maintenance beyond watering. And they only like to be re-watered when their soil is dry.

As I was thinking about new excuses to incorporate succulents into my formal-farmhouse home decor, I landed on the idea of creating living wall art as an indoor wall garden. Vertical gardens can be any size and shape, which makes creating them so much fun. And a wall garden can be customized to the style of your home, just by changing the material, shape, and the stain color.

For this project, I immediately envisioned using a charming color that I’ve chosen before for our dining table makeover. I smile about the Antique Jade from the Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain collection every time I sit down to eat. After months of use, the joy still hasn’t faded into the background, and I suspect it never will.

Supplies for the indoor wall garden.

Succulents. Before I started on this DIY project, I ordered a collection of succulents from Amazon in 2-inch pots. The two inches became the measurement that dictated the rest of the project.

Pallet wood. We have been building a variety of projects with pallets over the past few months, so I was lucky to have a collection of cut-offs in our wood pile. Finding a pallet can be easy or tough, depending on where you live. Typically your local Habitat for Humanity ReStore has pallets.

Stain. I chose Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain in Antique Jade, and used a synthetic brush to apply the stain.

Tools. For this project I used a cordless miter saw (an oscillating tool with clamps also would work), tape measure, impact driver, pencil, square, oscillating tool for sanding (sandpaper works fine, too), and all-purpose glue.

How-to for the indoor wall garden.

2-measure-pallet-wood-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-ArtThe first step to this project is measuring the pieces.

2d-measure-pallet-wood-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-ArtAfter marking each triangle, I checked the hypotenuse of the triangle.

3c-cut-pallet-wood-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-ArtCutting each triangle is fairly easy on a miter saw, but it isn’t the only saw that can cut the pieces.

5-layout-the-pieces-for-the-planter-boxes-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-ArtAfter cutting each piece, I lined them up to check that I cut everything I needed.

6-create-the-backer-for-the-planter-from-pallet-wood-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-ArtThe next part is creating the backer for the wall garden. We have a collection of small pieces of pallet wood, so it was a patchwork project fitting them all together.It would be much easier with long boards.

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IMG_2830The first step in staining involves some Minwax® Water Based Pre-Stain Wood Conditioner, which helps promote a uniform acceptance of stain. When working with pallet wood, I definitely recommend using a pre-stain. After the pre-stain is dry, which is about 15 minutes, lightly sand the finish before applying the stain.

13-first-dip-into-stain-antique-jade-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-ArtThere’s something magical about opening a can of color. I chose Minwax® Based Wood Stain in Antique Jade. I always make sure to carefully dip the brush so not to get too much on the brush for the first few passes.

Screenshot-2017-02-22-11.36.50The Cottage collection from Minwax® has a really sweet color palette of charming colors, perfect for a farmhouse style home.

14b-brushing-on-stain-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-ArtWhen staining wood, I like to go slow. Rushing a stain project can compromise a really good finish, and this stain will make the project last a very long time.

15-lining-inside-bottom-of-the-planter-boxes-for-water-sealing-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-Art-gorilla-glueI lined the bottom of each planter box with clear tape, so to add a bit of extra protection against water in the planter boxes.

IMG_2832-2The next step is sealing the stain with a protective finish. I recommend using Minwax® Polycrylic™ Protective Finish. It is ideal for sealing light-colored stains.

IMG_2271My little wall garden makes me very happy. The stain elevates the look from feeling like a rustic pallet into a sweet little wall art that warms up the room.

16f-Minwax-Succulent-Pallet-Wood-Wall-Art-e1487787068146Filled with little succulents, the wall art is a little pop of bliss in my home. Enjoying succulents in a new way, I’m happy to have spent the afternoon creating this project for my family to enjoy year-round.

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MyFixitUpLife shares design inspiration, DIY tips, and behind-the-scenes interviews MyFixitUpLife’s husband-and-wife duo, Mark & Theresa, design, renovate, and share how-to tips to make your projects easier and more fun.

Liven Up Your Wall’s Trickiest Places with this Narrow Display Shelf

Sometimes finding a piece of artwork or a display shelf to fit a narrow space can be a challenge, but a couple of long pallet boards gave me an idea for a vertical display with three small shelves.

After nailing two strips across the back and gluing the two boards together, I sanded them with #100-grit sandpaper to reveal more of the grain and to smooth any rough edges.

Since our wall is a light blue, I selected Minwax® Water Based Stain in “Charcoal Gray”, which is slightly darker, for my shelving unit.

After it dried, I distressed my pallet wood slightly by sanding off some of the stain, which let even more of the grain show. Afterwards, I glued and nailed each of the three shelves onto the back boards.

I then sprayed two coats of Minwax® Polycrylic™ Protective Finish to give the stain a semi-gloss sheen.

Here is how it looks hanging in our hallway between two doors.

I really like this combination of light and dark colors in the wood, as well as the ‘stepped’ positioning of the two back boards. If you scroll back up, you will see I did the same at the bottom of the shelf.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

Create a Stain Dipped Stool

As you may have discovered, furniture in storage does not fare well. I had used this stool for a staining demonstration on a television show I did last year, but afterwards it ended up in my storage room. Before long it had creeping mildew, not to mention, a colony of spiders living on it.

A friend turned me on to the “dipped” look which is now popular. After a light sanding to erase the mildew and scare away the spiders, I measured four inches down from the top of each leg, then wrapped it several times with masking tape.

I then opened a can of “Island Water,” a Water Based Minwax® stain, and applied stain to the area above each of the four taped legs. I then gave the top a fresh coat of stain to match.

After the stain had dried, all that was left was to spray on a coat of aerosol Minwax® Polycrylic™ Protective Finish. Since both the water-based stain and the Polycrylic dry quickly, before the day was done I was able to move my “dipped” stool into the house and near our fireplace.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce