Category Archives: Water Based Wood Stain

Create a Stain Dipped Stool

As you may have discovered, furniture in storage does not fare well. I had used this stool for a staining demonstration on a television show I did last year, but afterwards it ended up in my storage room. Before long it had creeping mildew, not to mention, a colony of spiders living on it.

A friend turned me on to the “dipped” look which is now popular. After a light sanding to erase the mildew and scare away the spiders, I measured four inches down from the top of each leg, then wrapped it several times with masking tape.

I then opened a can of “Island Water,” a Water Based Minwax® stain, and applied stain to the area above each of the four taped legs. I then gave the top a fresh coat of stain to match.

After the stain had dried, all that was left was to spray on a coat of aerosol Minwax® Polycrylic™ Protective Finish. Since both the water-based stain and the Polycrylic dry quickly, before the day was done I was able to move my “dipped” stool into the house and near our fireplace.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

A Pallet Wreath Perfect for the Holidays

When I saw these crumpled ribbons left over from last year’s evergreen wreaths, I got an idea for a holiday wreath that would last longer than just a few weeks.

I started with four pallet boards nailed to a backing strip to hold them in place. I could have cut them in a circle, but decided this would be a six-sided wreath.

After a light sanding to smooth the edges and open the pores, I tested two stains on my scraps, first choosing Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain in “Green Tea” for the wreath.

While it dried, I used that crumpled ribbon to make paper patterns for the bow and tails.

I laid each pattern over my pallet boards, cut them out and sanded them lightly.

Next I used “Crimson” of Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain to duplicate the color of the ribbons. They dried quickly, at which time I nailed them to the top of my wooden wreath.

Then, after a coat of Minwax® PolycrylicTM Protective Finish, my holiday wreath was ready to hang in our stairway – as it will be for years to come.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

Turning a Dingy Dining Table into Something Awesome with MyFixitUpLife

By: Guest Blogger

This week’s guest blog comes from Mark of MyFixitUpLife. See how Mark was able to make his wife, Theresa’s, table pallet idea come to life.

Finished pallet table

The carpenter in me always has to do a gut-check when my designer-wife says, I have pallet ideas. Oh no, I say. Then three things happen…

I love her, I trust her, and as a guy pretty much wandering around lost on the path less traveled, I swallow hard and try to find a way to make her vision come alive.

With the table done—we did this as part of the Minwax® “Made With Love. Finished With Minwax®. program we’re lucky to be part of—now I am amped to show you how this thing happened.

It started with a table that was pretty much a mess. Theresa liked the shape, but the finish was jumping off it, it was hard to keep clean, the leaves didn’t work right. You know, a mess.

Table Before

Doing the reverse gymnastics of taking the table top off the base is minimal fun. I found that I had to be really careful to not strip the screws.

Mark under the table

Pallets look good in photos, but in real life, they’re like a quarter you find on the street. You don’t know where they’ve been. So before assembling the table top, we applied a coat of Minwax® Polycrylic® Protective Finish to seal the boards.

Mark applying Minwax Polycrylic

We still wanted to be able to fold down the table leaves, so I set the first board tight to the hinged seam. A pneumatic finish nailer with 1-inch nails was awesome for this job. You could also use a pneumatic stapler—a tool I love enough to write a poem about—but the nails looked better.

Placing the first board on the table

Sometimes you need to remove a bent nail or a nail that is sitting too high (in carpenter lingo, that’s called ‘proud’). My go-to tool for this is often my diagonal cutting (dikes) pliers. Once you pull nails with these you’ll never go back to how you used to do it.

Removing a nail with pliers

We left most of the nails in the pallet wood. However, some were a problem so we took them out. In addition to the pliers, another option for dealing with nasty nails is to drive them—or at least get them started—out from the back side with a hammer and nail set.

Removing a nail by hammering

I sometimes complain that my wife makes things too complicated. I can be accused of the same thing. I got inspired to add—and then notch around—a center square to shake up the texture. I’m glad I did it.

Center square piece

Sometimes pallet ideas becoming pallet reality requires a little hacking. Since we really wanted to hide the old table top beneath this new texture and color, I chose to straighten some of the really warped pallet wood boards on the table saw.

Cutting pallet edges on a table saw

By flipping the table top upside down, I was able to use it as a guide for my jigsaw. It’s a little tricky to get perfect. Slow and steady wins the race. Don’t force the saw. Take your time and let the saw do the work. And use a sharp blade.

Using the table to guide cutting

I wire-brushed the table top before applying color. It was the absolute perfect solution (this one is a Hyde Tools wire brush, that also has a scraper on it) for opening the grain, dislodging dirt and cleaning up little pieces of glue left over from the nail gun nails. Make sure to clean the dust and debris off after wire brushing. I used a whisk broom for this. Easy.

Scouring the boards with a wire brush

I wire-brushed the table top before applying color. It was the absolute perfect solution (this one is a Hyde Tools wire brush, that also has a scraper on it) for opening the grain, dislodging dirt and cleaning up little pieces of glue left over from the nail gun nails. Make sure to clean the dust and debris off after wire brushing. I used a whisk broom for this. Easy.

Staining with Minwax in Antique Jade

That’s a real smile! Theresa jammed Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain in Antique Jade on this and it is clear to me why she is the designer and I am the carpenter.

The stain went on smooth, dried quickly and the brush was easy to clean with soap and water.

Pallet Ideas Tip: For rough-textured stock like pallet wood, I like to work the brush back and forth to help the stain cover evenly.

Staining the side of the table

Let’s talk about Minwax® Clear Brushing Lacquer, OK. It is one-quart of clear coating awesome. It set up in about 30-minutes, so I could zing two coats on in a day and the clear gloss finish…yeah, love affair.

Brushing on Minwax lacquer

We couldn’t add new wood to the table base and the factory finish was impenetrable. And it, too, was a mess like the table top so—again proving why she’s the designer and I’m Nicky Nail Gun—Theresa chose Krylon Chalky Finish New Leaf spray paint. It’s a perfect match for the table top and easy to apply to a multi-faceted assembly like this base.

Using Krylon to paint the table base

And that’s really about it for this pallet ideas project. A few things I’d recommend thinking about: Once you add the pallet wood to the table top, it’s heavy, so help moving it might be necessary. Also, with the lacquer, make sure to brush it nicely into the edges to get good coverage. And, get some lacquer thinner or acetone to clean your brush.

Staining the edge of the table

MyFixitUpLife shares design inspiration, DIY tips, and behind-the-scenes interviews MyFixitUpLife’s husband-and-wife duo, Mark & Theresa, design, renovate, and share how-to tips to make your projects easier and more fun.

Staining a New Bench with Zevy Joy

By: Guest Blogger

Annie of Zevy Joy shows us how she stained a beautiful Shaker style bench using Minwax® products.  

Finished bench with flower bag

So you may remember last month when I shared about my visit to the Seattle Renegade Craft Fair and my time with Minwax® there. Inspired by the campaign for this project, I’ve partnered with Minwax® again for this post. I’m sharing how I used their stain to finish a beautiful Shaker style bench.

I had a great time trying their products out and really am so pleased with the final product. It was so much easier than I had ever thought staining would be and the color stain is right up my “decor” alley.

Here is what I used and the steps I followed to get this white stained bench…

Tools and Minwax products used for the project

Here is how I completed these simple steps, including the pre-staining process all the way to the final polycrylic finish.

Sanding wood

I made sure the wood was free of dirt, paint or stain. Once it was ready to start, I gave the unfinished piece a light sanding with my 220 grit sandpaper.

Wiping off sawdust from the wood

Next, I wiped the sawdust away with a clean lint-free cloth.

Conditioning the wood with Minwax Pre-Stain Wood Conditioner

I then took the Minwax® Water-Based Pre-Stain Wood Conditioner (after stirring) and used my synthetic brush to apply it in the direction of the grain. I let it sit for no more than 5 minutes and then I rubbed any extra off (making sure not to let any excess unsaturated conditioner sit and dry). Once the piece was coated, I let it dry for 15 -30 minutes.

I came back after the wait time and lightly re-sanded in the direction of the grain to smooth out any raised grain (from the conditioner). As before, I wiped away the dust with a lint-free cloth.

Staining the wood

Now came the fun! I carefully applied the Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain in Pure White (making sure to carefully stir it before use). I used my synthetic brush to paint it on (always going in the direction of the grain) and then followed up with a lint-free cloth to smooth it out. I let it dry for 3 hours and then repeated the staining step once more with a second light coat and let it dry for another 3 hours. When I was done staining, I gave the stain a full 24 hours to set and dry. Then it was ready for the Polycrylic top coat.

Applying Polycrylic finish

I used my clean synthetic brush to apply the Minwax® Polycrylic® Protective Finish (always stirring before use). This protective finish needed 2 hours to dry in between coats.

Sanding after the stain is applied

Once dry, I gently sanded with my 220 grit sandpaper (this ensures an even second/third coat) and repeated the steps. I applied a total of 3 coats with a 2 hour wait time and sanding in between. The final 3rd coat remained unsanded as it is the final finish.

And that is it! I let it dry for a full 24 hours before we put it in its’ new home.

A couple things I learned along the way…

  • To practice beforehand. I tried out the process on some small unfinished pieces so that I could play around with colors and dry times etc… I thought that this step was valuable as when I went to work on the bench, I felt confident with the products and how they were applied.
  • Move fluidly with the stain, to always follow the grain and swiftly. I would be aware of drips or unevenness before dry times so that they were easy to adjust.
  • If needed, I could re-stain spots that were lighter than others to make the stain consistent. I didn’t need to do this in very many places but it did work
  • Just to go for it ;)… I didn’t worry too much and I enjoyed it. That is an important part!

Close up of stains bench legs

Here is the final product and I couldn’t be happier. The protective finish gives it a smooth coat on top that just enhances the shine. And my favorite part about this stain is how it really lets the wood grain steal the show.

Close up of bench side view

Finished Bench

Even though I love painting, chalk paint and more; stain is a wonderful way to achieve color while allowing the wood to show through and give detail to the piece. Or more so, it allows the wood grain to shine.

Wood grain showing

As you can see above, this bench is white, but the pattern of the grain goes unhidden.

It has become such a lovely addition to our dining set and it will continue to grow with our family over the years

Close up of bench side view with bag

Getting to try this out really set the record straight, that stain truly is user friendly and colors available today are versatile. They range from traditional wood tones to coastal colors. More than anything, staining allowed me to make this piece special for our family and give it my own style.

As I was working on this piece of furniture it was during the thick of warm summer days, I had my music going and the smell of sanding wood instantly brought me back to childhood memories.

My dad was a carpenter and as a little girl, he would work many days/nights out in our backyard (in his workshop) with music on, sawdust everywhere… I was always so proud of how he worked so hard and used his hands to make beautiful things…

with-chandelier

White table and finished bench

This project really was nostalgic for me. It was a delight to finish something like this myself, be reminded of those childhood memories and of my daddy making things too. I saw my kiddos watch from afar and through the windows as I fondly worked on this bench. It now has a dear place in my heart and I am anxious for the memories we will make sitting on this bench together here at this table. A little stain, a lot of heart and more memories to come; this time around with this sweet family of my own.

You can also head over to LIKE Minwax® on Facebook for more woodworking/wood staining inspiration! You can also watch this inspiring video that shares the heart behind the whole idea of, “Made With Love. Finished with Minwax®.”

I hope this post shows you how easy it can be to stain and how user friendly these Minwax products are. All opinions are 100% my own and I was flattered at the opportunity to work with Minwax on this project.

In her blog, Zevy Joy, Annie shares her experiences living on a budget, dressing for less, and decorating with what she has. See he story one project, recipe, and room at a time. Follow her on Facebook and Pinterest for more inspiration.