Get Organized with This Cherry Bookstand

Several years ago I made a simple cherry book rack for a television series I was shooting for the DIY network. This was one that I never finished, but had stowed away in a storage tub. I decided it was certainly worth finishing and giving to my son Blake, who is still in school.

Since cherry is a hardwood with a subtle grain, I only used #180-grit sandpaper, as anything coarse would leave swirling scratch marks in the wood.

My all-time favorite finish for cherry is a penetrating oil, such as Minwax® Wipe-On Poly, that I rub into the wood.

As you can see, the Wipe On Poly brings out the grain of the cherry, while giving it that hand-rubbed appearance we love to see.

It only took two coats to protect the wood and leave a satin sheen, making this a perfect desktop book rack for anyone you know. This one measures 11″ high by 8″ deep by 13″ wide, but you can make yours whatever size fits your space – and can draw the curve in whatever manner you like.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

How to Create a Simple Base for an Unusual Piece

When I saw this unusual piece of Southwestern pottery, I knew it would look great in my son Eric’s apartment in Salt Lake City. But as you can see, it has a small base, which made it easy to tip over.

The base had a hole in the bottom, so I devised a way that I could mount the pottery on an unfinished pine board I found at one of our local craft stores.

Minwax One Coat Polyurethane

First, though, I stained the board with Minwax® Wood Finish™  in “Classic Gray” to give the wood more of an aged, worn look that would go well with the piece of pottery. Afterwards, I protected the wood and the stain with a coat of Minwax® One Coat Polyurethane in a semi-gloss sheen.

To prevent the pottery from tipping over, I traced the opening in the bottom of the piece, cut out this piece of wood to match it, then ran a screw up through the bottom to secure it in place on top of the wood base.

I then was able to slip the piece of pottery down over the block of wood, which stabilized it, while still enabling Eric to lift it off if he decides to display it differently.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

Make Your Own Magnetic Knife Rack

I love browsing through my local craft supply stores, where I picked up this unfinished pine plaque, along with some small magnets, for an idea a friend had eliven to me.

I measured out some equally spaced holes, then drilled down to the depth of the magnets, using a drill bit the same diameter as the magnets. (Tip:  if you want to avoid drilling, you can attach the magnets with glue.)

Since the pine lacked color, I decided to stain it using a new Minwax® Gel Stain color – “Coffee”, as it would help disguise the dark magnets while still allowing the grain to show. You can stain the wood either before or after drilling the holes.

After a coat of aerosol Minwax® Fast-Drying Polyurethane had completely dried and cured, my magnetic knife rack was ready to mount on the wall in our kitchen. As you can see, the larger knives cover the magnets completely.

As another option, I took this old, worn cutting board, no longer suitable for kitchen use, and did the same thing to it, drilling the holes and inserting the magnets, making a unique knife rack for you or someone you need a special gift for.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

A Pallet Wreath Perfect for the Holidays

When I saw these crumpled ribbons left over from last year’s evergreen wreaths, I got an idea for a holiday wreath that would last longer than just a few weeks.

I started with four pallet boards nailed to a backing strip to hold them in place. I could have cut them in a circle, but decided this would be a six-sided wreath.

After a light sanding to smooth the edges and open the pores, I tested two stains on my scraps, first choosing Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain in “Green Tea” for the wreath.

While it dried, I used that crumpled ribbon to make paper patterns for the bow and tails.

I laid each pattern over my pallet boards, cut them out and sanded them lightly.

Next I used “Crimson” of Minwax® Water Based Wood Stain to duplicate the color of the ribbons. They dried quickly, at which time I nailed them to the top of my wooden wreath.

Then, after a coat of Minwax® PolycrylicTM Protective Finish, my holiday wreath was ready to hang in our stairway – as it will be for years to come.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce