Category Archives: Fast-Drying Polyurethane

How to Stain Unfinished Oak Cabinets

Tools Needed:

  • Minwax Wood Finish
  • Minwax Fast-Drying Polyurethane
  • Natural bristle brush
  • Drop cloth
  • Disposable gloves
  • Dish pan

Unfinished oak cabinets before staining

I spend a lot of time in my garage workshop, and I also spend a lot of my time looking for bargains, so when these unfinished oak cabinets went on sale, I bought them to go with some cherry cabinets left from our recent kitchen remodeling.

1. Apply wood stain to the surface
Preparing to apply Minwax wood finish to oak cabinets

While I knew from experience that I could never make my oak and cherry cabinets look identical, as they have totally different grain lines, I also knew that the right Minwax Wood Finish, such as Red Chestnut, would come close. And to make sure that it wouldn’t ruin my floor if I accidentally knocked over my can of stain, I placed my can of stain in an old plastic dish pan.

Using foam brush to apply cabinet stain

2. Remove excess stain

Brushing stain on a vertical surface can be messy, which is why I also used a drop cloth — and wore disposable gloves — but ….

Removing excess stain will reveal the finished look of the cabinets

… when I wiped off the excess stain a few minutes later, the color really brought out the beauty of the oak grain.

3. Apply a clear, protective finish

Apply a coat of fast-drying polyurethane to seal in cabinet stain

Stain provides color, but not the protection these garage cabinets would need, so I reached for a trusted finish:  Minwax Fast-Drying Polyurethane. Two coats brushed on with a natural bristle brush gave both my stain and the wood itself the protection they need.

How the Finished Cabinets Look After Staining

And while the oak cabinets still look a little different than the cherry cabinets, the combination of Minwax Wood Finish stain and Fast-Drying Polyurethane made me happy — and the cabinets take away any excuse I might have had for not keeping my workshop organized.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

How to Make a Walnut Desk with a Hidden Wireless Charger

By: Brad Rodriguez

Want a great-looking desk without any ugly wires? Check out the handsome walnut desk made by Minwax Partner Brad Rodriguez featuring a hidden wireless charger. The gorgeous finish is courtesy of Minwax Fast-Drying Polyurethane, chosen because it enhances the natural beauty of wood while providing lasting protection.

Subscribe to Brad’s channel here: https://www.youtube.com/c/fixthisbuil…

Join his Builder Club on Patreon and get Free Build Plans! https://www.patreon.com/fixthisbuildthat

And follow him on Social Media:

How to Build and Stain a New Tabletop

By: Minwax Partner

Hi! My name is Stacy Risenmay, and I’ll be showing you how to build a tabletop! This post is sponsored by Minwax, and you can find more of my work on my blog Not Just A Housewife.

My dining room has had a few different looks over the years. One thing that has stayed the same, however, has been the dining table. We love the table that was given to us by some friends when we lived in Vegas. It has beautiful legs and has fit well in our small dining nook. A year and a half or so ago I built a larger top that fit over the original top. It was so nice having a larger top but I didn’t like the edge coming down so far and I thought that the deep edge, plus the black, ended up making it feel bulky. This time when I built a new tabletop, I removed the original top all together and built a new top for the legs. It is easier than you might think to build a tabletop yourself!

Tabletop Before

I think I finally found the right combination of color and size for my new dining room tabletop. This is the perfect table for our little dining nook!

DIY Homemade Tabletop Stained with Minwax Weathered OakDIY Homemade Tabletop Stained with Minwax Weathered Oak

Tabletop After

White Dishware & Green Plant Decór for SpringtimeWhite Dishware & Green Plant Decór for Springtime

Supplies:

  • Minwax Pre-Stain Wood Conditioner
  • Minwax Wood Stain
  • Minwax Fast-Drying Polyurethane
  • 1×4 Boards
  • 2×2 Boards
  • Pocket Screws

Tools:

  • Purdy Ox Hair Brush
  • Kreg Jig
  • Screwdriver or Drill
  • 100-grit & 250-grit Sandpaper

How to Build the Tabletop

Step 1: Cut Boards

Cut the 1×4 boards to the length you want your table to be, taking into account that the 2×2 border will add three inches to the length and width. Cut as many as you need to get the width you want. Our dining nook is small, so our table ended up being 54 inches by 38 inches.

Step 2: Drill Holes

I drilled pocket holes and used pocket screws to join the 1×4 boards together. They also connected the 2×2 that went around the border.

Drilling Pocket Holes to attach Legs to DIY Tabletop

Step 3: I sanded the table with 100-grit sandpaper then finished off by hand sanding it with 250-grit. You need to make sure you finish with a fine grit sandpaper to eliminate the lines created by heavier grit sandpapers and sanders.

Stain the Tabletop

Step 4: Apply Wood Conditioner

Once it is sanded and the dust has been wiped off with a damp rag, apply a pre-stain wood conditioner. If you are going to use an oil-based stain, use an oil-based conditioner. If you want to use a water-based stain, there is a water-based conditioner as well. Follow the directions on the can and wait the appropriate time before applying the stain.

Step 5: Stain the Wood

Stain the wood with your choice of color. I wanted the tabletop to go with the reclaimed wood surrounding the giant chalkboard so I chose the Weathered Oak wood stain by Minwax. I have used it many times before and knew the stain color would be perfect! The more coats you put on, the darker the color. I ended up applying two coats. Soft applicators like the Purdy Ox Hair brush work best for applying stain.

Seal the Tabletop

Step 6: Apply Polyurethane

Once the wood stain has completely dried, it is time to brush on the polyurethane protective finish. Again, use a soft brush that is meant for oil-based polyurethane.

Applying Minwax Polyurethane with a Purdy Ox Hair Brush

Once the polyurethane has dried completely, sand it using a fine grit sandpaper. When wood gets stain and seal it can raise the grain and make it feel rough. Sanding it smoothens it and helps the second coat of polyurethane sealer to adhere. Sand in between each coat. A tabletop needs at least two coats, but three is best.

Sandpaper Used for DIY Tabletop

Applying Minwax Polyurethane with a Purdy Ox Hair Brush

Bonus: Stain your other furniture to match!

While I was at it, I also sanded down the top of my bench and stained it to match the table. The legs on the table and bench got a fresh coat of white paint. I love the whole look!

Springtime Tablescape Décor with White Dishware & Fresh GreenerySpringtime Tablescape Décor with White Dishware & Fresh Greenery

Decorating Your New DIY Tabletop

Springtime makes me think of gardening, so I picked up some potted herbs to keep in my kitchen until I can plant some in my garden. They made the perfect addition to the spring tablescape.

White walls, lots of greenery, and warm wood tones together is my favorite combination. The Weathered Oak color is perfect!

The large window lets in plenty of light. It is one of my most favorite sunny spots in the whole house.

I feel like I finally have my dining room where I want it to be, and it is bright and fresh!

Do you have a dining table that you love?

This post was sponsored by Minwax but all the ideas and opinions are all mine.

A Two-Tiered End Table

New furniture can be expensive and inexpensive furniture is often made of particleboard. So when we were looking for a new endtable, I decided I would need to get creative and build on myself. I really like these solid pine, pre-glued panels available in large home improvement centers. The panels come in a variety of lengths and widths and are easy to cut to whatever dimensions you prefer. They would serve as the perfect material for what I had in mind.

I started my end table project with 30″ x 18″ piece, then glued and screwed a 14″ section to one end for the back. The remaining section will become the second tier of my two-tiered end table.

Since the pine panels are just 3/4-inch thick, to give the appearance of being thicker, I glued and nailed 1″ x 2″ pine boards to the edges.

I then used Minwax® Stainable Wood Filler to disguise the small nail holes.

As soon as the Wood Filler had hardened and dried, I sanded the entire table with #150-grit sandpaper and vacuumed off the dust.

To reduce any blotchiness when I stained the pine, I first applied a coat of Minwax® Pre-Stain Wood Conditioner.

Fifteen minutes later, I grabbed a heavy-duty paper towel and began rubbing in a coat of Minwax® Wood Finish™ in “Honey.” I just wanted a light coat of stain, so after three minutes I then wiped off any stain the wood had not absorbed.

While the table was drying, I set my four unfinished legs on a scrap of foam board and sprayed on a coat of Minwax® Polyshades® in “Classic Black.” Polyshades® is a combination of both stain and polyurethane that, unlike paint, lets the grain of the wood show.

For the two tiers of the table,  I added two coats of clear Minwax® Fast-Drying Polyurethane. It really enhanced the beauty of the wood and will provide all the protection our end table will need.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce