Category Archives: Antiques

Upcycling A Pair of Stained Glass Doors

When my good friend Jim called from a local antiques shop, he really sounded excited. He had found these two arts and crafts stained glass cabinet doors and knew they would look great in our home. After a quick measurement, Leigh Ann and I realized they would fit perfectly in our two narrow bedroom windows.

The cabinet doors were covered with several layers of old white paint, so rather than risk sanding or stripping off any hidden lead paint, I decided to attach thin oak strips to create a new framework around the stained glass.

After nailing the strips of oak to the old frame, I filled the countersunk holes with Minwax® Stainable Wood Filler.

Once it had dried, I gave the new oak and the Stainable Wood Filler a quick sanding with #180-grit sandpaper, then vacuumed off the dust.

Since this was a small project, I reached for a tube of “Oak” Minwax® Express Color™ to stain and finish my new frame in one easy step.

Once the restoration was complete, all that I needed to hang them were four hooks and two lengths of chain. In just a few hours, I transformed two painted cabinet doors into two oak stained glass windows that provide both privacy and artistic color to our bedroom.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by.

Bruce

Restoring an Antique Bench

As much as I enjoy digging through antique shops, I continue to shop online, which is where I found this c.1910 Arts and Crafts stool with fabulous deep carvings.

But the oak was very dry, and the old, original finish needed protection against water, pets and guests. I knew immediately the best – and fastest – solution would be a thin coat of Minwax® Paste Finishing Wax.

Minwax® makes a high quality paste wax in two colors:  Natural and Special Dark for darker woods, such as my vintage stool.

All I needed to apply the wax was a soft cloth, which I used to work the wax into the pores of the wood. The dark stain in the wax also repaired some of the scratches and wear to the stool.

After letting the wax dry for about ten minutes, I took another clean cloth and buffed it up to a satin sheen. Less than thirty minutes from start to finish, my Arts and Crafts stool is already in our living room.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

Create a Table from Vintage Crates

Anytime I see a stack of old shipping crates, or even just one, my mind starts thinking about possible ways to re-purpose them while still maintaining their vintage look.

I typically start by making sure the nails are snug, the metal won’t snag anything, and the wood and lettering is protected by a coat of satin Minwax® Wipe-On Poly.

For this project I picked up a pre-glued, round, unfinished top, then stained it using Minwax® Wood Finish™ in Classic Gray. After the stain dried, I sealed the top with two coats of Minwax® Fast-Drying Polyurethane.

All it then took was a wood screw through the inside of the crate to secure the top in place. I then slipped it into the house and put it beside our couch to hold glasses, coffee mugs, magazines, and pottery.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce

Tips for Restoring & Protecting Furniture

No matter how careful we are, it always seems to happen:  a nick or a scratch suddenly appears on our furniture. We don’t have time for a complete refinishing, and getting out a can of stain just for a touch-up is inconvenient, so what’s a quick and easy solution?

This is when Minwax® Wood Finish™ Stain Markers are great to have around. These handy tubes of stain have a felt tip for easy application, so you just pick the color that matches your furniture, apply the stain, and wipe off any excess. It’s that easy.

In just a few minutes the stain is dry and the nick or scratch has nearly disappeared. Got time for one more tip?

The best way to preserve and protect an antique finish is with a coat of Minwax® Paste Finishing Wax, in either natural or special dark. Rub on, let it begin to dry, then buff with a soft cloth to a semi-gloss sheen – and you won’t have to worry about guests setting a glass on your family heirlooms.

Until next time,

Thanks for stopping by!

Bruce